Monday’s Music Moves Me – WELCOME TO MY BAR (Songs with Beverages in the Titles)

We are wrapping up August with a fun Monday’s Music Moves Me theme from this month’s Spotlight Conductor, Mary of Jingle Jangle Jungle. She’s challenged us to feature songs with beverages in the titles. Well, you know me, Bar Queen Extraordinaire. Although it was a while ago, my bar, the Pond Springs Saloon, was a cool beer & wine joint nestled in a northwest Austin neighborhood, complete with a few pool tables, three dart boards and a kickass jukebox, and was home to a bunch of Austin-area locals who liked to hang out in a laid-back establishment. A lot of folks would come in for our famous “fish-bowls,” huge frozen schooners iced in the freezer and filled to the brim with ice cold draft beer.

It was fun to fulfill a long-time dream of creating a neighborhood bar reminiscent of the Town of Niagara/Western New York and Pennsylvania bars and beer joints that I hung out in growing up, first when in tow with my parents who liked to stop and have a few beers with family and friends every now and again, and then when I was sowing my own wild oats in my late teens and early 20s. Although my place was in Texas, it definitely had that “Buffalo-feel”, not only in attitude but in decor too, as evidenced by the Buffalo Bills memorabilia that served not only to showcase my Buffalo pride but also to taunt the resident Dallas Cowboys fans.

Folks came in to hang with friends, to laugh and tell jokes, to share life’s trials and tribulations, to bitch and complain, to spout life philosophies, to boast and embellish life stories, to blow off a little steam, to flirt and try to hook up, to cry in their beers, to drink and sometimes often get drunk and act a fool…All that and other things that people like to do in their favorite home-away-from-home drinking establishment. They sought — and found — a place where everyone knew their names. [We even had our own resident “Norm” (a Cheers reference].

So in that spirit, I’ve opened a virtual bar here at Angels Bark. Here you’ll find a menu of great music categorized and tailored to your beverage of choice. Don’t forget your dollars for the jukebox! Let’s start with an introduction to the overall atmosphere where all kinds are welcome (well, almost all kinds. I’m keeping with the strict policy I had at my old bar: Sorry, no assholes allowed)…

WELCOME TO TRUHLIK’S TAVERN

This first playlist is just to get you in the mood, with some general drinking music, to be followed by a beverage-specific menu. Pull up a stool and hang out for a bit…

Roadhouse Blues by The Doors

Have a Drink on Me by AC/DC

One Bourbon, One Scotch and One Beer by George      Thorogood

I Drink Alone by George Thorogood

Drunk Americans by Toby Keith

Alcohol by Barenaked Ladies

Cheers theme song

 

Our bartenders are super friendly and aim to please.

WHAT CAN I GET FOR YA?   PICK YOUR POISON

BEER

Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers by ZZ Top

Beer for My Horses by Toby Keith & featuring Willie Nelson

Hold My Beer by Trace Adkins

I Like Girls That Drink Beer by Toby Keith

Hot Beer & Cold Women by Randy Houser

Pretty Good at Drinkin’ Beer by Billy Currington

A Dozen Roses & a Six-Pack by Cole Swindell

There’s a Tear in My Beer by Hank Williams and Hank Williams Jr.

 

WINE

Elderberry Wine by Elton John

White Lightning and Wine by Heart

Spill the Wine by Eric Burton and War

Red Wine (Ballad of Sacco and Vanzetti) by Woody Guthrie

Red Red Wine by Neil Diamond

Red Red Wine by UB40

Old Red Wine by The Who

Sweet Cherry Wine by Tommy James & the Shondells

God of Wine by Third Eye Blind

Pass the Wine by The Rolling Stones

The Night the Band Got the Wine by Al Stewart

Water with the Wine by Joan Armatrading

Wine into Water by T. Graham Brown

Wine After Whiskey by Carrie Underwood

 

TEQUILA

Tequila Sunrise by the Eagles

Tequila Eyes by Randy Rogers Band

Tequila Makes Her Clothes Fall Off by Joe Nichols

Mas Tequila by Sammy Hagar

Mexico, Tequila and Me by Alan Jackson

You and Tequila by Kenny Chesney

Tequila Loves Me by Kenny Chesney

Tattoos & Tequila by Vince Neil

When the Tequila Runs Out by Dawes

My Favorite Wine is Tequila by Michael Franti & Spearhead

 

WHISKEY

Whiskey Rock-a-Roller by Lynyrd Skynyrd

Poison Whiskey by Lynyrd Skynyrd

Whiskey Drinkin’ Woman by Nazareth

Whiskey River by Willie Nelson (side note: last week I had a Basenji, one of my dog boarders, named ‘Whiskey River’. He was named after this Willie Nelson song and he was a real pistol!)

Alabama Song (Whiskey Bar) by The Doors

Ain’t Enough Whiskey by Kid Rock

Lace and Whiskey by Alice Cooper

Whiskey and Lace by Krystal Keith

Jack Daniels and Jesus by Chase Rice

Not Enough Whiskey by Keifer Sutherland

Weed, Whiskey and Willie by Brothers Osborne

What Whiskey Does by Randy Houser

Whiskey Girl by Toby Keith

Whiskey in My Water by Tyler Farr

Whiskey in the Jar by Thin Lizzy

White Lightning by Scott Weiland and the Wildabouts

Whiskey by Maroon 5 featuring A$AP Rocky

Sunshine and Whiskey by Frankie Ballard

Moonshine by Bruno Mars

Wine After Whiskey by Carrie Underwood

Whiskey Rock-a-Roller LIVE by Lynyrd Skynyrd

Poison Whiskey LIVE by Lynyrd Skynyrd

Whiskey River by Willie Nelson LIVE in Austin Texas on 9/13/1984

 

GIN

Cocaine & Gin by Kid Rock

Cold Gin by Kiss

Of All the Gin Joints in the World by Fall Out Boy

Gin & Juice by Snoop Dog

Gin, Smoke, Lie by Turnpike Troubadours

Gin Soaked Boy by Tom Waits

Gin Bottle Blues by Lightnin Hopkins

Gin Guzzlin’ Frenzy by Mojo Nixon

Gin and Money by Marcy Playground

Misery and Gin by Merle Haggard – Live from Austin Texas 1985

 

RUM

Rum is the Reason by Toby Keith

Rum and Coca-Cola by The Andrew Sisters

A Rum Tale by Procol Harum

Rum by Brothers Osborne

Blame It On the Rum by Sunny Jim

Rum Jumbies by Sunny Jim

Haze of the Rum by Jesse Rice featuring Florida Georgia Line

Rum and Somethin’ by Donny Brewer

Rum Day by Cory Young

Rum Phonics by Gene Mitchell

Rummin’ and Chummin’ by John Friday

 

CHAMPAGNE

Champagne & Reefer by Muddy Waters

Champagne High by Sister Hazel

Champagne Kisses by Jessie Ware

Champagne Supernova by Oasis

Pink Champagne by Caitlin Rose

Champagne Life by Ne-Yo

 

SPECIALTY DRINKS

Strange Brew by Cream

(Escape) The Pina Colada Song by Rupert Holmes

Margaritaville by Jimmy Buffet

One Mint Julep by Ray Charles

 

And for those Designated Drivers, be sure to head to the Coffee Bar:

COFFEE BAR & OTHER NON-ALCOHOLIC DRINKS

Black Coffee in Bed by Squeeze

Coffee Blues by Mississippi John Hurt

One More Cup of Coffee by Bob Dylan

Tea for One by Led Zeppelin

Poprocks and Coke by Green Day

RC Cola and a Moon Pie by NRBQ

Orange Crush by R.E.M.

Apple Cider Reconstitution by Al Stewart

No Milk Today by Herman’s Hermits

Milk It by Nirvana

Milk and Alcohol by Dr. Feelgood

 

Well, it’s Last Call. And as I liked to say back in the day:

“Drink ’em up!

You don’t have to go home but you can’t stay here!”

 

Monday’s Music Moves Me (4M) is a blog hop hosted by Marie of X-Mas Dolly, and co-hosted by Cathy of Curious as a Cathy and Stacy of Stacy Uncorked Two other co-hosts recently joined the fun: Alana of Ramlin’ with AM and Naila Moon of Musings & Merriment with Michelle. Be sure to stop by and visit the hosts and the other participants listed below:

 

 

 

Monday’s Music Moves Me – In Honor of the Queen of Soul: A Tribute to Aretha Franklin

credit Monica Ahanonu (InStyle)

Aretha Franklin, the world’s Queen of Soul, died on Thursday. She was 76. 

 

She has left behind an extraordinary legacy of music that moves, in oh so many ways, and songs that instill confidence and unleash untapped power…but more than that, she left us with anthems of great import, her most widely recognized being RESPECT.

Originally a song by Otis Redding, “Respect” was written and recorded by him in 1965, which interestingly ended up being a significant one for him as well. (It was his second Top 40 hit, following “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now),” and it helped establish Redding on mainstream radio. Otis performed the song at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967 and this was a defining performance for the singer, who died in a plane crash six months later).

But Aretha came along and re-imagined the song. With a re-working of the lyrics, a musical rearrangement (via the Muscle Shoals studio musician’s soulful guitar hook, the background vocals and the added sax solo) and a completely different slant on the messaging, “Respect” was suddenly recognized the world over. Aretha’s rendition found greater success than the original, spending two weeks atop the Billboard Pop Singles chart, and eight weeks on the Billboard Black Singles chart. The changes in lyrics and production drove Franklin’s version to become an anthem for the increasingly large Civil Rights and Women’s Rights movements. She altered the lyrics to represent herself, a strong woman demanding respect from her man. Franklin’s demands for “Respect” were “associated either with black freedom struggles or women’s liberation.”

The song also became a hit internationally, reaching #10 in the UK and helping to transform Aretha Franklin from a domestic star into an international one.

FUN FACTOtis Redding himself was impressed with the performance of the song. At the Monterey Pop Festival in the summer of the cover’s release, he was quoted playfully describing “Respect” as the song “that a girl took away from me, a friend of mine, this girl she just took this song”. “When her hit single ‘Respect’ climbed the charts in July 1967, some fans declared that the summer of 1967 was ‘the summer of ‘Retha, Rap, and Revolt.'”  Adorable!

I am partial to many of Aretha’s songs but “Respect” hits some real nostalgia notes in me. Not only is this amazing song a landmark anthem, it’s a ton of fun!

The song came out at the apex of a social and political climate on the verge of a major shift. “Respect” hit at a time when millions of people were feeling marginalized in an era where inequality and social injustice was the norm. This song became a theme song in the civil rights movement and a feminist anthem that encouraged women to not only recognize their worth but to insist that others acknowledge and respect it. It was then, and is now still, a song of empowerment.

In addition to all that (and so much more), it’s just a damn good song! It was an anthem of sorts for me too, and it was featured prominently on the jukebox of my bar. When I opened my bar, music was a priority in the planning. When I ordered the jukebox, I asked the company rep about the music. I was told that the company uses demographics and research on what songs perform best in terms of frequency of play and that they load the music based on those metrics.  And I said, “Ah, nah, I don’t like that. That’s not going to work. I want to pick and choose the music that’s going to be on my bar’s jukebox.” And so I did.

As you can imagine, that jukebox had some incredibly kickass music on it. And my bar developed a reputation for it even. I always got a charge when new folks would walk in and say “We heard this place has the best jukebox in town!” Oh yeah, proud mama.

Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” was one of the first songs I chose to be on the jukebox. It often was the ‘Last Call’ anthem. At the end of the night, I’d cue up the song and call “Last Call for alcohol!” and, with the speaker control behind the bar, I’d crank that baby up and “Respect” would vibrate and dominate. It would be so loud that it was virtually impossible to hold a conversation for those few minutes; the customers just had to get up and dance. It was a highlight on so many nights and it always amazed me how that song could completely change the mood and the dynamic of the place. Everybody would be singing and dancing and laughing because that song just moves people. It evokes an ultimate feel-good and you just can’t help but smile when it plays. Every time I hear it now, my mind wanders to my old “bar days”. Some great and interesting memories for sure.

Long Live Aretha!

I’m not going to do a big write-up on Aretha because the world is inundated with articles and stories and tributes to our Queen of Soul. There are several wonderful pieces online and I’ll share links of some that I particularly enjoyed.

I will leave you with some music though. The following is my Plug and Play Aretha Playlist for your listening pleasure. It kicks off with my top 5 favorite Aretha songs. Enjoy!

Playlist Songs, in order:

  • Respect – 1967
  • (You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman – 1967 (co-written by Carole King, Gerry Goffin and Atlantic Records’ Jerry Wexler); the video in the playlist is Aretha’s 2015 performance at the Kennedy Center Honors in tribute to the song’s co-writer Carole King who was receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award.
  • Think1968
  • Freeway of Love – 1985 (This is one of my favorite Aretha Franklin songs because it reminds me of my dear sweet Aunt Judy, who so loved this song! God rest her soul. I miss my Aunt Judy so much!)
  • Sisters Are Doin’ It for Themselves – 1985 (another of my favorites, this was a collaborative hit with Aretha and the Eurythmics)
  • I Say a Little Prayer – 1968 (written by Burt Bacharach & Hal David for Dionne Warwick in 1967; Aretha covered it in 1968)
  • (Sweet Sweet Baby) Since You’ve Been Gone – 1968
  • I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Loved You) – 1967
  • Do Right Woman, Do Right Man – 1967
  • A Change is Gonna Come – 1967 (Aretha’s cover of Sam Cooke’s 1964 song)
  • Spirit in the Dark – 1970
  • The Thrill is Gone – 1970 (original by blue musician Roy Hawkins in 1951 and then B.B. King in 1970; this song was the B-side to “Spirit in the Dark”)
  • Rock Steady – 1971
  • Chain of Fools – 1967
  • Dr. Feelgood – 1967
  • See-Saw – 1968 (Aretha’s cover of Don Covay’s 1965 song)
  • Don’t Play that Song (You Lied) – 1970 (performed with the Dixie Flyers, this song is a cover of Ben E. King’s 1962 song)
  • You’re All I Need to Get By – 1971 (Aretha Franklin’s cover of the 1968 duet by Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell)
  • Angel – 1973 (a soul ballad co-written by Aretha’s sister Carolyn & Sonny Saunders)
  • The Weight – 1972 (This song features Aretha Franklin on Duane Allman’s “An Anthology” album)
  • Spanish Harlem – 1971 (Aretha Franklin released a cover version of Ben E. King’s 1960 song in the middle of 1971 that outperformed the original on the charts, charting #1 R&B for three weeks and #2 Pop for two weeks. Aretha’s version earned a gold single for sales of over one million. Dr. John played keyboards on Franklin’s version with Bernard “Pretty” Purdie on drums and Chuck Rainey on bass. This version hit #6 on Billboard’s Easy Listening chart. Franklin also changed the lyrics slightly, from “A red rose up in Spanish Harlem” to “There’s a rose in Black ‘n Spanish Harlem. A rose in Black ‘n Spanish Harlem.”
  • Until You Come Back to Me (That’s What I’m Gonna Do) – 1973
  • Day Dreaming – 1972
  • I’m in Love – 1974 – (“I’m in Love” is a song written by Bobby Womack in the 1960s in response to some of the criticism he had been receiving after marrying the widow of the recently deceased Sam Cooke. The song was given to Wilson Pickett and his version became a top-ten R&B hit on Billboard’s chart in 1968, peaking at #4 as well as peaking at #45 on the Billboard Hot 100. However, the version to achieve the most success came in 1974, when Aretha Franklin released it as a single. Her version topped Billboard’s R&B chart for two weeks and also peaked at number nineteen on the Billboard Hot 100.)
  • Who’s Zoomin’ Who – 1985
  • A Deeper Love – 1994
  • Honey – 1994 (written by Babyface)
  • Willing to Forgive – 1994
  • A Rose is Still a Rose – 1998

REST IN ETERNAL PEACE ARETHA!

“Rest in eternal peace” was the sentiment expressed by Barack Obama in his social media tribute to Aretha. He had a close affinity with her and her music moved him to tears (as evidenced in the video of Aretha’s performance for Carole King in December 2015 when she was receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Kennedy Center Honors). Aretha also performed at President Obama’s 2009 Inauguration.

Here is his Instagram post:

View this post on Instagram

America has no royalty. But we do have a chance to earn something more enduring. Born in Memphis and raised in Detroit, Aretha Franklin grew up performing gospel songs in her father’s congregation. For more than six decades since, every time she sang, we were all graced with a glimpse of the divine. Through her compositions and unmatched musicianship, Aretha helped define the American experience. In her voice, we could feel our history, all of it and in every shade—our power and our pain, our darkness and our light, our quest for redemption and our hard-won respect. She helped us feel more connected to each other, more hopeful, more human. And sometimes she helped us just forget about everything else and dance. Aretha may have passed on to a better place, but the gift of her music remains to inspire us all. May the Queen of Soul rest in eternal peace. Michelle and I send our prayers and warmest sympathies to her family and all those moved by her song.

A post shared by Barack Obama (@barackobama) on

 

I included that Instagram post because I found this very comical mashup video on YouTube of Obama singing “Respect”. I just had to… 

 

The Beautiful Aretha Franklin

 

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I found it interesting to see how the print media is honoring this Soul Dynamo. In particular, I may order a copy of the 8-page commemorative section, “Eternal Respect”, from the Detroit Free Press, Aretha’s hometown paper. The following is taken from Ad Age magazine:

HOW NEWSPAPERS AROUND THE WORLD ARE REMEMBERING ARETHA FRANKLIN

By Published on .

Aretha Franklin, who died on Thursday, “was the loftiest name in the rich history of Detroit music and one of the transcendent cultural figures of the 20th Century,” Brian McCollum writes in the Detroit Free Press. “Raised on an eclectic musical diet of gospel, R&B, classical and jazz, she blossomed out of her father’s Detroit church to become the most distinguished black female artist of all time, breaking boundaries while placing nearly 100 hits on Billboard’s R&B chart—20 of them reaching No. 1.”

The news of Franklin’s passing continues to reverberate across the world today, and many papers, including the Free Press, pay tribute to the soul legend on their front pages this morning. A small sampling:

Credit: Detroit Free Press
Credit: The New York Times
Credit: New York Post
Credit: New York Daily News
Credit: National Post
Credit: The Washington Post
Credit: The Guardian
Credit: USA Today
Credit: The Wall Street Journal
Credit: Libération

And don’t forget: Monday’s Music Moves Me (4M) is a blog hop hosted by Marie of X-Mas Dolly, and co-hosted by Cathy of Curious as a Cathy and Stacy of Stacy Uncorked Two other co-hosts recently joined the fun: Alana of Ramlin’ with AM and Naila Moon of Musings & Merriment with Michelle. Be sure to stop by and visit the hosts and the other participants listed below:

Monday’s Music Moves Me: SONGS WITH ANIMALS IN THE TITLES

It’s Monday and you know what that means: It’s time for some kickass music with Monday’s Music Moves Me! Today’s theme is especially fun and near & dear to my heart. It was chosen by our August Conductor, Mary over at Jingle Jangle Jungle (she’s also my battle partner in the Ultimate Dog v Cat Battle of the Bands Tournament and if you haven’t been checking it out, you need to start because even though we’re coming up on Round Three, it’s not too late to jump in and play along. DO IT! IT’S FUN!)

Anyway, Mary’s brilliant theme for today’s 4M post is SONGS WITH ANIMALS IN THE TITLE. Now you know I jumped all over that one, right? I think I’ve put together a pretty cool post for you all today. First up is the Welcome to My Zoo playlist. There are zillions of songs with animals in the titles; here I’ve listed only a bunch of my particular favorites. We’re going to start out hard to get your blood circulating and your heart pumping, and then we’ll gradually slow it down to a nice mellow flow of incredible music. Below is the list of the songs along with a few tidbits of background information. Scroll through and pick out which songs you want to hear or simply hit PLAY and let it run. It’s a great playlist to just listen to while doing your thing. If and when you have time, be sure to check out some of the videos because there are quite a few cool ones in there.

Then, I have a few other neat surprises, as in three other (short) playlists (The Funny Farm playlist comes up after this one and then there’s a Beatles Block of Animal Rock, and then, well, you’ll see. For sure the one at the end I think you’ll really dig). So hang out with me for a bit and let’s take a joyride through my animal kingdom. Let’s Rock!

The Welcome to My Zoo playlist songs include:

Animal by Def Leppard – from the 1987 Hysteria album; this song about a raging animal lust took three years to complete. This was Def Leppard’s first hit in their native England. Even Pyromania, which was a massive hit album in America, was largely ignored in their home country. “Animal” was the song that finally broke through in the UK, and it earned them their first appearance on the popular music TV show Top Of The Pops).

The Zoo by the Scorpions – a song by the German hard rock band Scorpions, from their 1980 Animal Magnetism album. It was written by group members Rudolf Schenker (guitar) and Klaus Meine (vocals). Schenker wrote much of the music during the band’s first tour of the United States in 1979. When Meine first heard Schenker’s riff, it reminded him of the band’s earlier visit to a street in New York City humorously referred to as a “zoo”. Meine later composed the song’s lyrics, which contain references to city streets, especially New York’s 42nd Street.

Walkin’ the Dog by Aerosmith – from the debut album AEROSMITH, 1973. The song “Walkin’ the Dog” is a cover of a song originally performed by R&B singer Rufus Thomas from Memphis, Tennessee. The lyrics make references to children’s nursery rhymes, especially Miss Mary Mack.

Sick as a Dog by Aerosmith – from ROCKS, Aerosmith’s fourth studio album released in 1976. AllMusic described Rocks as having “captured Aerosmith at their most raw and rocking.” Previously, Aerosmith had recorded three albums: Aerosmith (1973), Get Your Wings (1974), and the breakthrough LP Toys in the Attic (1975), which produced Top Ten hit “Walk This Way” and the popular “Sweet Emotion.” Although often derided by critics, the band had amassed a loyal fanbase following from relentless touring and their ferocious live shows. They also began living the rock-and-roll lifestyle to the hilt, indulging their already considerable appetite for drugs. However, their hedonistic lifestyle did not appear to hamper them creatively; Rocks was considered by many fans, critics, and fellow musicians to be one of the highlights of their career. Guitarist Joe Perry later recalled, “There’s no doubt we were doing a lot of drugs by then, but whatever we were doing, it was still working for us.”

Of this song, lead guitarist Joe Perry said, “Tom (Hamilton) played rhythm guitar on “Sick as a Dog.” I played bass for the first half of the song. Then I put the bass down and played guitar in the end, and Steven picked up the bass and played it for the rest of the song – all live in the studio! One take.”

Hair of the Dog by Nazareth – “Hair of the Dog” is the title track of Nazareth’s 1975 album Hair of the Dog. It is sometimes called “Son of a Bitch” because of the repeated lyric in the hook (“Now you’re messing with a son of a bitch”). The song is about a charming and manipulative woman who can get men to acquiesce to her every need. The singer is letting her know that she has met her match in him, a self-described “son of a bitch.”

As a standalone song, it only charted in Germany, where it peaked at #44. In the United States, because the Hair of the Dog album was a top-20 hit on the album charts, the song received extensive airplay on album-oriented rock stations (despite “bitch” being a borderline profanity) and remains in the playlist of most classic rock formatted stations. In the USA, it was released as the B-Side of “Love Hurts.”

Black Dog by Led Zeppelin – from the untitled but commonly referred to Led Zeppelin IV album, 1971. This song was also used in my Round One of the Ultimate Dog v Cat Battle of the Bands Tournament, where it came out the victor of that round. You can read more about the song over at that post.

Dog Eat Dog by Ted Nugent – from 1976’s Free-For-All; this is the album that inspired the many air-guitar “mini-concerts” that my friend JoAnn and I used to put on in the girls bathroom in high school. Yes, I played air-guitar. Don’t say it… And this was the other contender in Round One of the Dog v Cat Battle.

Cat Scratch Fever by Ted Nugent – from the 1977 album of the same name. Cat Scratch Fever is a real condition: it’s an infectious disease caused by a cat scratch that usually affects young children. AND I HAD IT! I remember having to be taken to the doctor and told that I had Cat Scratch Fever. That’s probably why I liked that song so much. Nugent, however, changes the meaning to make it much more lustful, with the “cats” being women. The song is about sex and his rampant desire for it, or put more succinctly by Nugent, it’s “about pussy.” Go figure. PS: Mary used this song in her Round One of the Dog v Cat Battle at Jingle Jangle Jungle.

War Pigs by Black Sabbath – from my favorite Black Sabbath album, Paranoid, 1970. The original title of “War Pigs” was “Walpurgis”, dealing with the witches’ sabbath. “Walpurgis is sort of like Christmas for Satanists. And to me, war was the big Satan”, said bassist and lyricist Geezer Butler. “It wasn’t about politics or government or anything. It was Evil itself. So I was saying ‘generals gathered in the masses / just like witches at black masses’ to make an analogy. But when we brought it to the record company, they thought ‘Walpurgis’ sounded too Satanic. And that’s when we turned it into ‘War Pigs’. But we didn’t change the lyrics, because they were already finished.”

White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane – “White Rabbit” is a song written by Grace Slick and recorded by the American rock band Jefferson Airplane for their 1967 album Surrealistic Pillow. It was released as a single and became the band’s second top-10 success, peaking at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song uses imagery found in the fantasy works of Lewis Carroll—1865’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and its 1871 sequel Through the Looking-Glass—such as changing size after taking pills or drinking an unknown liquid. Slick claimed the composition was supposed to be a slap to parents who read their children such novels and then wondered why their children later used drugs.

Monkey On My Back by Aerosmith  – written by Aersomith frontman Steven Tyler & lead guitarist Joe Perry for the 1989 album Pump. The song is one of Aerosmith’s most straightforward songs about how the band overcame drug abuse and addiction, and got the “monkey off their back.” In the video The Making of Pump, Steven Tyler discusses how it was one of the few songs on Pump with profane lyrics, in the line “feeding that fuckin’ monkey on my back”. But Tyler felt he needed to make use of the word, to be more harsh and garner more attention on the issue. He felt it would make kids’ ears perk up and listen to the lyrics and message of the song, which was more effective in telling the consequences of drug use, rather than the attitude of the time which was simply “just say no”.

Shake Me Like a Monkey by Dave Matthews Band  – from the album Big Whiskey and the GrooGrux King, 2009. Matthews told Relix magazine about this piece of stutter-stepping funk: “Of all the songs on the album, this one, in a way, is the most throwaway lyric. But it’s not really throwaway because it’s like an invitation: Don’t be all highfalutin! Don’t be too good to feel good! Don’t be too hip to f–kin’ understand! Wake the f–k up! Get off your ass and feel some s–it…” More on this interview at Songfacts.

Monkey Man by the Rolling Stones – from the 1969 album Let It Bleed; Mick Jagger and Keith Richards wrote “Monkey Man” as a tribute to Italian pop artist Mario Schifano, whom they met on the set of his movie Umano Non Umano! (Human, Not Human!)

Shock the Monkey by Peter Gabriel – from the 1982 album Peter Gabriel, his fourth eponymous album. It is sometimes known by the title Security. The song is sometimes mistaken as being about shock therapy, but Gabriel has said it is a song about jealousy.

Black Sheep by Gin Wigmore – from New Zealand pop-singer Gin Wigmore’s 2011 album Gravel & Wine. I was first introduced to Gin Wigmore because her music was used in the VH-1 reality show Mob Wives (which I really liked and miss now that it’s not on anymore!

Black Sheep of the Family by Rainbow – from the album Ritchie Blackmore’s Rainbow, released in 1975

Peace Frog by The Doors – from the 1970 album Morrison Hotel. The line in the lyrics “Blood in the streets in the town of New Haven” likely refers to Morrison’s December 9, 1967 arrest at the New Haven Arena during a concert. After an altercation with a police officer backstage, Morrison made the incident known to the concert audience, and was arrested for attempting to incite a riot. A similar line about Chicago probably refers to the conflict surrounding the 1968 Democratic National Convention. The video in my playlist points to some of his altercations with police and arena security.

Barracuda by Heart – the first single from Heart’s second album Little Queen in 1977.  Ann Wilson revealed in interviews that the song was about Heart’s anger towards Mushroom Records’ attempted publicity stunt involving her and her sister Nancy Wilson in a made-up incestuous affair. As producer Michael Flicker put it: “‘Barracuda’ was created conceptually out of a lot of this record business bullshit. Barracuda could be anyone from the local promotion man to the president of a record company. That is the barracuda. It was born out of that whole experience.”

Stray Cat Blues by the Rolling Stones – from the Stones 1968 Beggars Banquet album; The song is told from the perspective of a man lusting after having illegal sex with a 15-year-old groupie, reasoning that “it’s no hanging matter, it’s no capital crime.”

Honky Cat by Elton John – from the 1972 album Honky Château, the album’s lead-off track

Little Red Rooster by the Rolling Stones – “Little Red Rooster” (or “The Red Rooster” as it was first titled) is a blues standard credited to arranger and songwriter Willie Dixon. The song was first recorded in 1961 by American blues musician Howlin’ Wolf in the Chicago blues style. The Rolling Stones were among the first British rock groups to record modern electric blues songs. In 1964, they recorded “Little Red Rooster” with original member Brian Jones, a key player in the recording. Their rendition, which remains closer to the original arrangement than Cooke’s, became a number one record in the UK and continues to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart. The Stones frequently performed it on television and in concert and released several live recordings of the song. “Little Red Rooster” continues to be performed and recorded, making it one of Willie Dixon’s best-known compositions.

Dixie Chicken by Little Feat Dixie Chicken is the third studio album by the American rock band Little Feat, released in 1973. The album is considered their landmark album with the title track as their signature song that helped further define the Little Feat sound.

Law Dogs by the Doobie Brothers – a more recent release, “Law Dogs” comes from the Doobie Brothers thirteenth studio album, World Gone Crazy, released on September 28, 2010. It debuted at number 39 on the Billboard top 200 albums chart, their highest charting position since 1989. Per guitarist Tom Johnston, “Part of the inspiration of ‘World Gone Crazy’ is the world has gotten a little nuts. And between the wars that we’ve had, between violence in the streets and most of the cities, what people are doing to each other around the world is not stuff that would have happened 20 years ago.”

Crocodile Rock by Elton John – This song was written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin, and was released in October 1972 in the UK and in November 1972 in the U.S. as a pre-release single from his forthcoming 1973 album Don’t Shoot Me I’m Only the Piano Player. It became his first U.S. number-one single, reaching the top spot on 3 February 1973, and stayed there for three weeks.

This tells the story of a guy in the ’50s and ’60s who frequented a restaurant where the patrons loved an obscure dance called the Crocodile Rock. Because of all the events that happened in the ’60s, however, this unknown little dance forever vanished into history and no one cared anymore. Even his girlfriend, who also enjoyed “burning up to the Crocodile Rock,” left him. It’s a catchy little song with really sad lyrics.

Elton performed this on The Muppet Show when he appeared on a Season Two episode in 1977. A very popular song with kids, it made for a great opening number, with Elton performing in a swamp with a crocodile chorus. It’s pretty adorable. See for yourself:

The Lion Sleeps Tonight by the Tokens – A hunting song originally sung in Zulu in what is now Swaziland, the original title was “Mbube,” which means lion. This was popularized in the 1930s by South African singer Solomon Linda, who recorded it in 1939 with his group, The Evening Birds. Apparently they were a bold bunch, and got the idea from when they used to chase lions who were going after the cattle owned by their families.

There is a lot of background to this song and I’m just too darn tired to go into it so look it up if you’re interested. To keep this short and sweet, The Tokens (Hank Medress, Jay Siegel, and Phil and Mitch Margo) had a #1 hit with this song during the holiday season in 1961-62.

Eye of the Tiger by Survivor – in 1982, “Eye of the Tiger” was composed by American rock band Survivor. It was released as a single from their third album of the same name Eye of the Tiger and was also the theme song for the film Rocky III, which was released a day before the single.

Hungry Like the Wolf by Duran Duran – “Hungry Like the Wolf” is a song by the British new wave band Duran Duran. Written by the band members, the song was produced for their second studio album Rio. The song was released in May 1982 as the band’s fifth single in the United Kingdom. It reached the top 5 of the UK Singles Chart.

The music video for “Hungry Like the Wolf” was directed by Russell Mulcahy and filmed in the jungles of Sri Lanka, and evoked the atmosphere of the film Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. Although the band initially failed to break into the US market, MTV placed the “Hungry Like the Wolf” video into heavy rotation. Subsequently, the group gained much exposure; the song peaked at the number 3 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 in March 1983, and Duran Duran became an international sensation. The video won the first Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video in 1984.

I Love My Dog by Cat Stevens – “I Love My Dog” is a song written by Cat Stevens, and was his first single, appearing the following year on his debut album Matthew and Son. Stevens later acknowledged that he had essentially written the lyrics to the music of American jazz multi-instrumentalist Yusef Lateef’s “The Plum Blossom”, from his 1961 Eastern Sounds. Yusuf indicated that he “told Yusef Lateef about it, gave him a big check, and in fact, started paying him royalties.” The song is now released with credits that include Yusef Lateef.

I’ll Be Doggone by Marvin Gaye – “I’ll Be Doggone” is a 1965 song recorded by American soul singer Marvin Gaye and released on the Tamla label. The song talks about how a man tells his woman that he’ll be “doggone” about simple things but if she did him wrong that he’d be “long gone”.

It became his first million-selling record and his first number-one single on the R&B chart, staying there for two weeks, and was the first song Gaye recorded with Smokey Robinson as one of the songwriters of the record. The song was co-written by Robinson’s fellow Miracles members Pete Moore and Marv Tarplin. The Miracles also sang background on this recording, along with Motown’s long-standing female back-up group, The Andantes, and Miracle Marv Tarplin played lead guitar. “I’ll Be Doggone” gave Marvin his third top-ten pop hit, where it peaked at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100, with that number matched by his follow-up record, “Ain’t That Peculiar”. (BTW, this song was also a contender in my Round Two Dog v Cat battle of soft rock dog songs and it came out the victor.

Fox on the Run by Sweet – In this song, the band is addressing a groupie, who is the “fox on the run.” Apparently she’s had more than one go with the band, as Brian Connolly sings that she doesn’t look the same – probably a bit more worn from her lifestyle. He also makes it clear that he has no interest in hearing her talk and certainly doesn’t want to know her name.

Sweet was produced by the glam rock architects Mike Chapman and Nicky Chinn, who also wrote most of their songs, including all of their hits to this point. “Fox On The Run” was written by the band – Brian Connolly, Stephen Priest, Andrew Scott, Michael Tucker – and included on their 1974 album Desolation Boulevard.

After the album was released, the band parted ways with Chapman and Chinn and produced their own material. Their first effort was a reworking of “Fox On The Run,” which was originally helmed by Chapman/Chinn. Defying predictions of disaster, Sweet proved quite capable on their own, and the new version of “Fox,” with a bright chorus and bold echo, became a global hit, reaching #2 UK and charting across Europe (it was #1 in Germany, where Sweet was wildly popular). It also became one of the few American hits for the band when it was released in the US as the follow-up to their single “Ballroom Blitz.”

A Horse with No Name by America – from America’s self-titled debut album, “A Horse with No Name” is a song written by America’s Dewey Bunnell. It was the band’s first and most successful single, released in early 1972 in the United States, and topped the charts in several countries.

Wild Horses by Rolling Stones – “Wild Horses” is a song by the Rolling Stones from their 1971 album Sticky Fingers, written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Year of the Cat by Al Stewart – “Year of the Cat” is a single by Scottish singer-songwriter Al Stewart, released in July 1976. The song is the title track of his 1976 album Year of the Cat, and was recorded at Abbey Road Studios, London in January 1976 by engineer Alan Parsons. The song reached #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in March 1977. Although Stewart’s highest charting single on that chart was 1978’s “Time Passages”, “Year of the Cat” has remained Stewart’s signature recording, receiving regular airplay on both classic rock and folk rock stations.

Cat’s in the Cradle by Harry Chapin – “Cat’s in the Cradle” is a 1974 folk rock song by Harry Chapin from the album Verities & Balderdash. The single topped the Billboard Hot 100 in December 1974. As Chapin’s only No. 1 hit song, it became the best known of his work and a staple for folk rock music. Chapin’s recording of the song was nominated for the 1975 Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance.

Dog and Butterfly by Heart“Dog & Butterfly” is a song recorded by the rock band Heart. It is the title track to the band’s fourth studio album Dog & Butterfly and was released as the album’s second single. The song is a more subdued effort from the band, differing from past hard rock-oriented hits, as Ann and Nancy Wilson pulled from their folk music influences. The song charted moderately in the US in 1979, peaking at #34 on the Billboard Hot 100. Although it enjoyed only moderate chart success, the song has gone on to be viewed as a classic and has remained a set-list staple consistently through the years.

When Doves Cry by Prince – “When Doves Cry” is a song by American musician Prince, and the lead single from his 1984 album Purple Rain. It was a worldwide hit, and his first American number one single, topping the charts for five weeks. According to Billboard magazine, it was the top-selling single of the year. Following Prince’s death, the song re-charted on the Billboard Hot 100 chart at number eight, its first appearance in the top 10 since the week ending September 1, 1984.

The music video (directed by Prince himself) was released on MTV in June 1984. It opens with white doves emerging from double doors to reveal Prince in a bathtub. It also includes scenes from the Purple Rain film interspersed with shots of The Revolution performing and dancing in a white room. The final portion of the video incorporates a mirrored frame of the left half of the picture, creating a doubling effect. The video was nominated for Best Choreography at 1985’s MTV Video Music Awards. The video sparked controversy among network executives who thought that its sexual nature was too explicit for television.

Seagull by Bad Company – from English supergroup Bad Company’s eponymous debut album, released in June 1974. Written by Paul Rodgers and Mick Ralphs. Paul Rodgers (Classic Rock Revisited January 12, 2001): “Every song that we have done has its own story. ‘Seagull’ was written sitting on the beach. Music is about atmosphere. The best way to create the atmosphere is to actually be there. You don’t have to imagine it. It is right there. With Seagull, you could see the horizon. You can include that in the songs. That is what writing songs is all about; creating mood and atmosphere.” Bad Company was the first concert I ever attended, back in 1976 in Niagara Falls, NY. Back then the cost for a concert ticket was $6. Holy shit, I’m old!

The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway by Genesis – “The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway” is the first song from Genesis’s 1974 album of the same name. The song was released as a single in the U.S.. Although it did not chart, it was frequently played on American FM radio stations.

Like other songs on the album, the music and lyrics in “The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway” are partially derived from 1960s soul songs. The end of the song features the words “They say the neon lights are bright on Broadway. They say there’s always magic in the air” from The Drifters’ song “On Broadway”.

Freebird by Lynryd Skynyrd – a power ballad by American rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. The song was first featured on the band’s debut album (Pronounced ‘Lĕh-‘nérd ‘Skin-‘nérd) in 1973. It is considered to be Lynyrd Skynyrd’s signature song, is used as a finale during their live performances, and is their longest song, often going well over 14 minutes when played live.

Okay, this next one’s a stretch but I’m including it anyway because it’s all about a horse. I remember hearing it all the time on my transistor radio way back when. Here’s Wildfire by Michael Martin Murphy – This haunting soft rock song from 1975 describes a disillusioned homesteader captivated with the tragic story of a girl and her lost horse. The Nebraska girl died in a blizzard one year searching for Wildfire, her beloved horse that had broken out of his stall. Now their ghosts wander free, and the farmer, having lost his crops to weather, imagines joining them in death.

 

Hey, you’ve arrived at the next stop in our animal tour:

The Funny Farm

Here’s an animal playlist that should give you some giggles…or at least a smile or two. Enjoy!

 

Dead Skunk by Loudon Wainwright III – a 1972 novelty song

See Ya Later Alligator by Bill Haley – a 1950s rock and roll song written and first recorded by American singer-songwriter Bobby Charles but was a Top Ten hit for Bill Haley and His Comets in 1956.

What’s New, Pussycat? by Tom Jones – the theme song for the eponymous movie, sung by British singer Tom Jones, and written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1966, it peaked at number 3 in the U.S. and was Jones’ second entry on the Top 40.

Puppy Love by Paul Anka – a popular song written by Paul Anka in 1960 for Annette Funicello, whom he was dating at the time. Anka’s version reached #2 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Rockin’ Robin by Michael Jackson – written by Leon René under the pseudonym of Jimmie Thomas and recorded by Bobby Day in 1958. It was Day’s biggest hit single, becoming a No. 2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 and spent one week at the top of the charts (number one hit) in R&B sales.

Michael Jackson recorded his own version of “Rockin’ Robin” in 1972, which was released as a single from his gold-certified solo album titled Got to Be There. It was the biggest hit from the album, hitting No. 1 on the Cash Box singles chart and peaking at no. 2 on both the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B charts.

This was one of my favorite songs back then…Of course, it was perfect for me as I was 10 years old.

Jeremiah Was a Bullfrog by the Three Dog Night – “Joy to the World” is a song written by Hoyt Axton and made famous by the band Three Dog Night. The song is also popularly known by its opening lyric, “Jeremiah was a bullfrog.” Three Dog Night originally released the song on their fourth studio album, Naturally, in November 1970, and subsequently released an edited version of the song as a single in February 1971.

The song, which has been described by members of Three Dog Night as a “kid’s song” and a “silly song,” topped the singles charts in North America, was certified gold by the RIAA, and has since been covered by multiple artists.

The song is featured prominently in the film The Big Chill. It is sung by a child character at the beginning and the Three Dog Night recording is played over the end credits. It is also played at the end of every Denver Broncos home victory.

Rock Lobster by the B-52s – “Rock Lobster” is a song written by Fred Schneider and Ricky Wilson, two members of The B-52’s. It is part of the band’s 1979 self-titled debut album. The song became one of their signature tunes and it helped launch the band’s success.

“Rock Lobster” was the band’s first single to appear on the Billboard Hot 100, where it reached No. 56. A major hit in Canada, the single went all the way to No. 1 in the RPM national singles chart.

According to a “Behind the Vinyl” video with Fred Schneider for CHBM-FM, the song was mostly inspired by a discotheque in Atlanta called “2001”, where instead of having a light show, the club featured a slide show with pictures of puppies, babies and lobsters on a grill.

The song’s lyrics describe a beach party while mentioning both real and imagined marine animals (“There goes a dogfish, chased by a catfish, in flew a sea robin, watch out for that piranha, there goes a narwhal, here comes a bikini whale!”), with absurd noises accompanying each, provided by Kate Pierson on the higher-pitched sounds and Cindy Wilson the lower-pitched ones. The chorus consists of the words “Rock Lobster!” repeated on top of a keyboard line.

If you’re going to watch one video from this group, be sure to watch this one. It just about killed me the other night. I had been working on my post for hours and was just about to take a quick break and run to the bathroom but the Rock Lobster video started and I couldn’t move from my seat. I could feel the expression on my face as perplexed but oddly interested and I just couldn’t turn away. I truly had to pee so bad but I just couldn’t leave until the video ended. I was immobilized by sheer entertainment. I have always enjoyed this song and think it’s a riot. I get a real kick every time I hear it. But I had never seen it performed live. I was fascinated at the bizarre performance. The lead vocals dude: just couldn’t get enough! It’s that, um, interesting…

Who Let the Dogs Out by the Baha Men – “Who Let the Dogs Out?” is a song performed by the Bahamian group Baha Men, released as a single on July 26, 2000. The song peaked at number two on the UK Singles Chart, as well as topping the charts in Australia and New Zealand, and reached the Top 40 in the United States. It was Britain’s fourth biggest-selling single of 2000, and went on to become one of the highest-selling singles of the decade not to reach number-one. The track went on to win the Grammy for Best Dance Recording on the 2001 Grammy Awards.

Muskrat Love by Captain & Tenille – “Muskrat Love” is a soft rock song written by Willis Alan Ramsey. The song depicts a romantic liaison between two anthropomorphic muskrats named Susie and Sam. It was first recorded in 1972 by Ramsey himself for his sole album release Willis Alan Ramsey. The song was originally titled “Muskrat Candlelight” referencing the song’s opening lyric. A 1973 cover version by the rock band America—retitled “Muskrat Love” for the lyrics that close the chorus—was a minor hit reaching number 67 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. (REALLY?? I didn’t know that! Did you??) In 1976, a cover by pop music duo Captain & Tennille resulted in the song’s highest profile, peaking at number four on the Hot 100 chart. It also reached number two on the Cash Box chart, which ranked it as the 30th biggest hit of 1976. Now THAT just blows me away…

Spiders & Snakes by Jim Stafford“Spiders & Snakes” is a 1974 hit song recorded by Jim Stafford and written by Stafford and David Bellamy. It was the second of four U.S. Top 40 singles released from his eponymous debut album and also the highest-charting.

The song is about a boy who, although he is shy, has a girl who likes him named Mary Lou. He makes faltering attempts to respond to her when they are alone, which finally include trying to give her a frog. She promptly protests and summarily rebuffs him. Still in school, they later develop a more mature relationship with the boy as the initiator instead of Mary Lou, but when they are once again alone she nonetheless feels the need to remind him, still nervous, that she does “not” like spiders and snakes, or any other such similar creatures, and that it takes something else to satisfy her loving desires.

“Spiders and Snakes” was one of the top hits of 1974, spending one week at number three on the US Billboard Hot 100. In Canada, the song reached number one. The song spent five and a half months on the US charts, sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA on March 8, 1974.

Brown Chicken, Brown Cow by Trace Adkins – “Brown Chicken Brown Cow” is a song recorded by American country artist Trace Adkins. It was released in January 2011 as the third and final single and the opening track from his ninth studio album Cowboy’s Back in Town. “Brown Chicken Brown Cow,” takes Adkins’ video catalog to a whole new level — puppets.

Adkins, who serves as the narrator during the video, sings a tale of two lovers, Bobby Jo and Betty (also puppets), who make a habit of running off to the barn for some alone time. The farm animals, including the brown chicken and brown cow, have front row seats to their farmers’ escapades.

The song, which uses a sexual innuendo on “bow chicka bow wow” (an onomatopoeia for music in pornography), was withdrawn after only nine weeks, and Adkins later apologized for releasing it.

The song is actually the punch line to a sexual joke — the online Urban Dictionary refers to “brown chicken brown cow” as “an onomatopoeic imitation of the guitar riff commonly used in 1970’s porn movies.” Despite its adult-themed lyrical content, Atkins was not afraid to release it. “I kinda pushed for that to be the first single,” from his new album, he told GAC. “I said, ‘Let’s just throw a hand grenade in the room right off the get-go.’ I said, ‘It’s a dangerous record. I know that, but I’m not afraid of it.’ Everybody else by committee was kinda like ‘Oh, I don’t know about that.’”

I included more details on the making of the song and the public and professional flack that Adkins received because of it in my Kaleidoscope of Color Songs – Brown Edition post. Take a jump over there if you want to read more about this hilarious song.

 

The Beatles Block of Animal Rock

It seems that the Fab Four were definitely into animals too. They had so many songs with animals in the titles that I decided we ought to take a pit stop on this little journey and kick back with an exclusive Beatles Block of Rock. Enjoy!

The playlist features the following Beatles classics:

Hey Bulldog – from Yellow Submarine, 1969

Rocky Raccoon – from the 1968 double album The Beatles (aka the “White Album”)

Octopus’ Garden – written and sung by Ringo Starr (credited to his real name Richard Starkey) from the Beatles’ 1969 album Abbey Road. George Harrison, who assisted Ringo with the song, commented: “‘Octopus’s Garden’ is Ringo’s song. It’s only the second song Ringo has ever written, mind you, and it’s lovely.” He added that the song gets very deep into the listener’s consciousness “…because it’s so peaceful. I suppose Ringo is writing cosmic songs these days without even realizing it.” It was the last song released by the Beatles featuring Starr on lead vocals.

Blackbird – from the 1968 double album The Beatles (aka “the White Album”). The song was performed as a solo effort by Paul McCartney. The song was also written by McCartney, although it is credited to Lennon–McCartney. McCartney has stated that the lyrics of the song were inspired by hearing the call of a blackbird in Rishikesh, India, as well as by the unfortunate state of race relations in the United States in the 1960s.

I Am the Walrus – released in November 1967. It was featured in the Beatles’ television film Magical Mystery Tour in December of that year, as a track on the associated Magical Mystery Tour album. Since the single and the double EP held at one time in December 1967 the top two slots on the British singles chart, the song had the distinction of being at number 1 and number 2 simultaneously.

Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except for Me & My Monkey – from the 1968 double album The Beatles (aka “the White Album”). The song was written by John Lennon (and credited to Lennon–McCartney).

 

Ah, we’re nearing the end of our journey through this musical jungle. To close this post, I thought it only fitting to slow it down with probably the most appropriate album for our 4M theme today, Pink Floyd’s 1977 concept album: ANIMALS. This is by far their best album, in my humble opinion. Of course I have a strong attachment to 1973’s Dark Side of the Moon, Pink Floyd’s eighth album, as most of my generation does. But Animals — Wow! Now that is an album that I spent many a night tripping to.

Animals is the tenth studio album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was first released in January 1977 by Harvest Records in the United Kingdom and by Columbia Records in the United States. It is a concept album that provides a scathing critique of the social-political conditions of late 1970s Britain, and presents a marked change in musical style from their earlier work. Animals was recorded at the band’s Britannia Row Studios in London, but its production was punctuated by the early signs of discord that, three years later, would culminate in keyboardist Richard Wright leaving the band. The album’s cover image, a pig floating between two chimneys of the Battersea Power Station, was conceived by the band’s bassist and lead songwriter Roger Waters, and was designed by long-time collaborator Storm Thorgerson.

The album was released to generally positive reviews in the United Kingdom, where it reached number 2 on the UK Albums Chart. It was also a success in the United States, reaching number 3 on the US Billboard 200. It scored on US charts for half a year and these steady sales have resulted in its certification by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) at 4x platinum.

Loosely based on George Orwell’s political fable Animal Farm, the album’s lyrics describe various classes in society as different kinds of animals: the combative dogs, the despotic ruthless pigs, and the “mindless and unquestioning herd” of sheep. Whereas the novella focuses on Stalinism, the album is a critique of capitalism and differs again in that the sheep eventually rise up to overpower the dogs. The album was developed from a collection of unrelated songs into a concept which, in the words of author Glenn Povey, “described the apparent social and moral decay of society, likening the human condition to that of mere animals”.

The album is comprised of only 5 songs (4 really, because the first and last song on the album is a two-parter: Part 1 opens the album and Part 2 closes it. The songs, and their meanings, are listed below:

Pigs on the Wing (Part 1)

Dogs

Pigs (3 Different Ones)

Sheep

Pigs on the Wing (Part 2)

The following playlist includes each of the Animals songs in order of their appearance on the album. So, take a deep breath, find a mellow space, smoke a joint if you have one, put on the headphones and take a dreamy trip into this social commentary classic.

“Pigs on the Wing” is a two-part song, opening and closing the album. According to various interviews, it was written by Roger Waters as a declaration of love to his new wife Carolyne Christie. This song is significantly different from the other three songs on the album, “Dogs”, “Pigs”, and “Sheep” in that the other songs are dark, whereas this one is lighter-themed, as well as also being much shorter in duration at under a minute and a half while the others are over 10 minutes in length.

“Dogs”: Fitting into the album’s Orwellian concept of comparing human behavior to various animals, “Dogs” concentrates on the aggressive, ruthlessly competitive world of business, describing a high-powered businessman. The first two verses detail his predatory nature — outwardly charming and respectable with his “club tie and a firm handshake, a certain look in the eye and an easy smile”, while behind this facade he lies waiting “to pick out the easy meat…to strike when the moment is right”, and to stab those who trust him in the back. Subsequent verses portray the emptiness of his existence catching up to him as he grows older, retiring to the south rich but unloved: “just another sad old man, all alone and dying of cancer”, and drowning under the weight of a metaphorical stone.

The final verse explores a number of aspects of business life and how it compares to dogs, for example taking chances and being “trained not to spit in the fan”, losing their individuality (“broken by trained personnel”), obeying their superiors (“fitted with collar and chain”), being rewarded for good behaviour (“given a pat on the back”), working harder than the other workers (“breaking away from the pack”) and getting to know everyone but spending less time with family (“only a stranger at home”). Recommended by a friend of Roger Waters named Joel Eaves, this line was personal to him as he was split from his family at infancy, being “broken away”, as he put it. He later joined the Air Force squadron known as “Wolfpack”, which directly inspired the implementation of this line. Every line of this verse begins with the words “Who was”, which prompted comparison to Allen Ginsberg’s poem “Howl”.[6] However, Waters has denied the Ginsberg poem was any influence on his lyrics. Instead, these lines can be seen as subordinate clauses to the lyric line that precedes them (“And you believe at heart everyone’s a killer/Who was born in a house full of pain/Who was [etc.]”).

“Pigs (Three Different Ones)” – In the album’s three parts, “Dogs”, “Pigs” and “Sheep”, pigs represent the people whom Roger Waters considers to be at the top of the social ladder, the ones with wealth and power; they also manipulate the rest of society and encourage them to be viciously competitive and cutthroat, so the pigs can remain powerful.

The song’s three verses each presents a different “pig”, the identities of which remain a subject of speculation, because only the third verse clearly identifies its subject as being morality campaigner Mary Whitehouse, who is described as a “house proud town mouse” who has to “keep it all on the inside.”

Along with dogs and sheep, pigs are one of 3 animals represented on the album. The pigs represent people, like Whitehouse, who feel they are the moral authorities. The sheep are the people who obey the pigs and believe that it is the “Christian” thing to do and are just your normal, hard-working innocent bystanders. Dogs are people who are against the pigs and are back stabbers.

Roger Waters wrote this about Mary Whitehouse, a British woman who led a movement to keep sex off TV. He felt Whitehouse had no right to decide what other people should watch. Speaking to Mojo magazine Waters recalled:

“Oh, she was everywhere pontificating on TV. Interfering in everybody’s life, making a nuisance of herself and trying to drag English society back to an age of Victorian propriety.”

In 1992, on the Westwood One radio special Pink Floyd : The 25th Anniversary Special, Roger Waters told Jim Ladd that the “Whitehouse” mentioned had nothing to do with the home of the U.S. President, the White House, after Ladd told Waters he interpreted the last verse as an attack on Gerald Ford, who was US president at the time the song was recorded.

Mary Whitehouse was a famous name in the UK at the time the song was written. However, Waters admitted to Mojo that nobody listening to Animals in America had a clue who she was: He said: “Everybody in the United States assumed it was an attack on the president, on Washington, on the White House.”

Halfway through the song, David Gilmour uses a Heil talk box on the guitar solo to mimic the sound of pigs. This is the first use of a talk box by Pink Floyd.

“Sheep” – The sheep represents the mindless people who follow the herd. There is a “subliminal” message on this song that is a parody of the 23rd Psalm. It is heard beneath the music in a robotic, distorted voice, with sheep heard in the background. “The Lord is my shepherd, He converteth me to lamb cutlets….”.

Talking about “Sheep” in 1978, Waters said the song was inspired by the 1976 Notting Hill riots in west London. He described it “as my sense of what was to come down… with the riots in England.”

When Mojo asked Waters in 2017 if he still went along with the above quote, he said: “It may well be about all that. Sheep does have that idea of revolution, of people being led to slaughter.”

Album Personnel:

  • David Gilmour – lead guitar, co-lead vocals, rhythm and acoustic guitar on “Dogs”, bass guitar on “Pigs (Three Different Ones)” and “Sheep”, talk box on “Pigs (Three Different Ones)”
  • Nick Mason – drums, percussion, tape effects
  • Roger Waters – lead and harmony vocals, acoustic guitar on “Pigs on the Wing”, rhythm guitar on “Pigs (Three Different Ones)” and “Sheep”, tape effects, vocoder, bass guitar on “Dogs”
  • Richard Wright – Hammond organ, electric piano, Minimoog, ARP string synthesizer, piano, clavinet, harmony vocals on “Dogs”

 

THAT’S A WRAP!

We’ve come to the end of our ride through my Animal Kingdom. I sure hope you’ve enjoyed it as much as I enjoyed putting it together. Let me know what you think in the Comments section below. What are some of your favorite Animal songs? What did you like best about your trip here today?

And don’t forget: Monday’s Music Moves Me (4M) is a blog hop hosted by Marie of X-Mas Dolly, and co-hosted by Cathy of Curious as a Cathy and Stacy of Stacy Uncorked Two other co-hosts recently joined the fun: Alana of Ramlin’ with AM and Naila Moon of Musings & Merriment with Michelle. Be sure to stop by and visit the hosts and the other participants listed below:

 

 

 

Monday’s Music Moves Me: SONGS IN SIGN LANGUAGE

It’s Monday so you know what that means: MUSIC! Today’s Monday’s Music Moves Me theme is totally different than any other that I’ve ever done and I’ve really enjoyed diving into it. Our Conductor for the month of July has been Michelle at Musings and Merriment with Michelle and she’s chosen a unique and challenging theme of presenting songs in sign language.

My first exposure to sign language was when I was in high school. I was hanging out at my friend Lee’s house, spending the night on the weekend. I loved hanging out over there because first of all she was/is absolutely hilarious and, secondly, it comes naturally because her whole family was extraordinarily funny and just a blast to be around. I can’t remember exactly the year but it was back when Saturday Night Live was the shit. It was when the series was at its height and its comedic talent reigned supreme. This was back in the days of the original Not Ready for Prime Time Players (Dan Aykroyd, John Belushi. Chevy Chase [final episode: October 30, 1976], Jane Curtin, Garrett Morris, Bill Murray [first episode: January 15, 1977], Laraine Newman and Gilda Radner), the Coneheads, that family of aliens with their bald conical heads (Dan Aykroyd as father Beldar, Jane Curtin as mother Prymaat, and Laraine Newman as daughter Connie), and Gilda Radner as Roseanne Roseannadanna as the consumer affairs reporter on the Weekend Update segment. I bring this up only because Lee did an amazing incredible imitation of Gilda Radner doing Roseanne Roseannadanna and every time I think of her, I inevitably think of the many nights spent over at her house watching SNL and all of us cracking up when she’d do her Gilda impression.

Anyway, it was through Lee that I experienced up close and personal the beautiful language of signing. Lee’s cousin (I believe it was her cousin) was deaf and she committed to completely learning sign language so they could communicate. Watching the two of them talk, using these beautiful hand gestures, incorporating their fingers and arms with facial expressions, and to see how effectively they communicated and understood each other without uttering a single sound was just fascinating to me. Even more beautiful was seeing the genuine laughter shared between the two of them and how through their sign language, he became part of the group conversation and so naturally joined in the fun we were all having.

That was my first exposure to sign language but certainly not the last. My church employs an interpreter for the deaf and hard of hearing and I always find myself captivated and completely mesmerized by the signing of the sermons and the songs.

Michelle asked us to present songs in sign language. I found some really cool songs to share with you. Some of them I’m familiar with and a few others are new-to-me. Although most are not my typical genre of choice, I really like them all. I hope you enjoy listening to and watching them as much as I did. A list of the playlist songs follow. After that I’m sharing some videos of a really cute couple who sign a few of their favorite songs. They will certainly put a smile on your face. And then there’s one more surprise that I just had to share so be sure to read all the way to the end.

  1. Rolling in the Deep by Adele
  2. She Drives Me Crazy by the Fine Young Cannibals
  3. Just the Way You Are by Bruno Mars
  4. Shape of You by Ed Sheeran
  5. My Valentine by Paul McCartney, featuring Natalie Portman and Johnny Depp
  6. Imagine by John Lennon
  7. Wrecking Ball by Miley Cyrus
  8. We Will Rock You by Queen
  9. Happy by Pharrell Williams
  10. The Lazy Song by Bruno Mars
  11. I’m Deaf by Sean Forbes
  12. Hell No by Ingrid Michaelson

And here’s one that I would almost never listen to because, well, it’s Marilyn Manson (whose real name is Brian Hugh Warner, born 1969 in Canton, Ohio), that heavy metal shock rock-er who came up with his stage name by a juxtaposing two opposing American pop cultural icons: Marilyn Monroe and Charles Manson. His style of music doesn’t appeal to me at all BUT I have to say that I really dig his 2003 song “This is the New Shit” — It’s actually quite catchy. And it’s extremely enjoyable to watch B. Storm interpret it for us. See what you think. Note: the first minute or so is a disclaimer and message from B. Storm, delivered in silence.

 

Here is this adorable couple I found on YouTube. Tina Cleveland is an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter and her fiancé Paul Sirimarco is learning to sign so they could make these super heartwarming videos.

 

Finally, I just had to share this! From a week ago (7/18/2018) on the site of Boston’s Classic Rock station WZLX 100.7fm: The headline reads:

Sign Language Interpreter Owns This Slayer Concert

Followed by this:

You have to love someone who throws themselves into their work. Take this sign language interpreter at a Slayer concert. She could just sign the words, but she wants the hearing impaired to feel the bombastic 120 decibel sound storm, scream fest that is a Slayer concert. Bravo!

And here she is: I’m no Slayer fan but I sure did appreciate her interpretation.

 

So that’s my Songs in Sign Language post for this week’s Monday’s Music Moves Me. So what did you think? Do you know sign language? If so, how and why did you learn it?

Did you know that it is unclear how many sign languages currently exist worldwide? A common misconception is that all sign languages are the same worldwide or that sign language is international. Each country generally has its own, native sign language, and some have more than one (although there are also substantial similarities among all sign languages). The 2013 edition of Ethnologue lists 137 sign languages. It is important to note that just because a spoken language is intelligible transnationally, such as English in the United States and the United Kingdom, does not mean that the sign languages from those regions are as well; ASL and British Sign Language (BSL) were formed independently and are therefore not mutually intelligible. Interesting stuff!

Regarding SNL: this is a message to my hometown friend, mentioned at the beginning of this post.

Hey Lee G, this one’s for you! Miss ya tons Girlfriend…

 

Monday’s Music Moves Me (4M) is a blog hop hosted by Marie of X-Mas Dolly, and co-hosted by Cathy of Curious as a Cathy and Stacy of Stacy Uncorked Two other co-hosts recently joined the fun: Alana of Ramlin’ with AM and Naila Moon of Musings & Merriment with Michelle. Be sure to stop by and visit the hosts and the other participants listed below:

 

 

 

 

Monday’s Music Moves Me – A Kaleidoscope of Color Songs Series comes to an end with the BLUE Edition, PART 2!

It’s a Freebie for today’s Monday’s Music Moves Me and believe it or not, we are coming to the end (well, almost) of my Kaleidoscope of Color Songs Series with the final color being BLUE. This series has focused on songs with colors in the title and every color has been highlighted. If you missed any and would like to check them out, I have a page of links to the various editions.

Because there were so many songs that I like with the color Blue in the title, I broke this edition into two parts. This is the BLUE Edition, PART 2. (If you missed Part 1, you can check it out here…and I highly encourage you to as there are some kickass blue songs in that group!). Today’s BLUE PART 2 has a number of fabulous blue songs too. Here is my playlist, followed by some interesting info on each of the blue songs featured. ENJOY!

Blue Money by Van Morrison – “Blue Money” is a song written by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison. It was the second of two Top Forty hits from his 1970 album, His Band and the Street Choir (the other being “Domino”), reaching #23 on the US charts. The US single featured “Sweet Thing”, from the album Astral Weeks, as the B-side. It was released as a single in the UK in June 1971 with a different B-side, “Call Me Up in Dreamland”. The song became Morrison’s third best-selling single of the 1970s, remaining on the charts for three months.

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Critical response to the song: Robert Christgau, writing in the Village Voice in 1971, described “Blue Money” and “Domino” as “superb examples of Morrison’s loose, allusive white R&B.” Writer M. Mark described it as “a pun-filled song about time and cash.” Biographer Brian Hinton compared the song’s sound to Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames—”boozy horns and a nonsensical chorus.” Maury Dean (musician, professor and author of “The Rock Revolution” which is in the Rock N’ Roll Hall of Fame and the Smithsonian) also praises the song’s “snarly, snappity sounds” and Morrison’s “jazzy baritone.”

The lyrics have the singer promising his girl that they will paint the town together with her “blue money.” Critic Maury Dean states that the theme picks up from Lefty Frizzell’s 1950 #1 song “If You’ve Got the Money I’ve Got the Time.” In a 1972 Rolling Stone interview with John Grissim Jr., Morrison commented about the popularity of “Blue Money” in cities like Boston and New York: “Out here I get asked to play ‘Blue Money’ all the time. All the kids love it, the kids in the street. It’s their favorite number.”

What is “blue money”? According to one source I found online: “Blue Money” is a song written and recorded by Van Morrison in 1970. What Blue Money refers to in the song, and in most uses of the term, is money earned from salacious or racy photographs and images. So, in the Van Morrison song, when he sings “The photographer smiles, take a break for a while, do your very best… when this is all over, we’ll be in clover, and we’ll go out and spend all of your Blue Money,” he’s watching his woman have naked or nearly naked pictures taken of her and is looking forward to spending what she makes- the aforementioned Blue Money!”

Hmm. I never thought it was that! Although I can see the tie-in with the lyrics referencing the photographer. Though I always assumed it meant rich-kid/trust-fund kid money, like that from a blue blood. Here’s another definition of blue money:

Blue Money. Slang; money that a person or business spends with poor management or accountability.

So what do you think Van Morrison is referring to, this “blue money”??

Blue Collar Man by Styx – “Blue Collar Man (Long Nights)” is the first single that Styx released from the 1978 album Pieces of Eight. The song reached No. 21 in the United States, and spent two weeks at No. 9 on the Canada RPM Top 100 Singles chart.

This song tells the story of a man who is sick of being mocked for being jobless. He tries to get a job and when he is denied, he tries to persuade people into hiring him.

Styx guitarist Tommy Shaw wrote this song and sang the lead vocals. It’s a good example of his songwriting philosophy, which is to write songs people can relate to and enjoy.

This is one of the songs Styx plays at just about every concert. On their 2011 tour, it was their opening number, as with unemployment in the United States over 9%, the song was more relevant than ever.

Tommy Shaw came up with the guitar riff after a pot-fueled deep sea fishing trip. He explained to The A/V Club that their cab driver gave them some potent weed on the way to the boat, which put them in a daze. Says Shaw:

“When we booked this fishing boat, we said, ‘We are going to be partying. Because we just finished this tour, and we have a cooler and drinks, and I hope you don’t mind if we party.’ Well, we smoked this pot, and by the time we got on the boat, we were paralyzed. We were, like, stone quiet for the first hour and a half. We finally started coming around a little bit and told [the boat owner] what happened. He’s like, ‘I wondered what happened to you guys, because you said there was going to be this big party, and you guys haven’t said a word.’ We’re all sitting there in this daze from this pot, and the boat was making this sound: ‘mmm mmm mmm.’ You are moving slowly when you are trolling through the water. The engines are at really low RPMs. The sound just sort of tattooed itself onto my psyche. And when I got back to the room, I got the acoustic guitar and wrote the music to ‘Blue Collar Man.'”

Lol. I can understand that happeneing…

Released in 1978, the single came in two 7″ vinyl formats: one with the b-side “Superstars” (a track from The Grand Illusion) and a second single with the instrumental album track “Aku-Aku” as the b-side. Some printings of the single were also issued in a translucent blue vinyl, which are now highly sought after collectors items. Do any of you have the blue vinyl copy?

Mr. Blue Sky by Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) – “Mr. Blue Sky” is a song by British rock group Electric Light Orchestra (ELO), featured on the band’s seventh studio album Out of the Blue (1977). Written and produced by frontman Jeff Lynne, the song forms the fourth and final track of the “Concerto for a Rainy Day” suite, on side three of the original double album. The lyrics are uplifting, and follow the concept of a rainy day that comes to an end.

“Mr. Blue Sky” was the second single to be taken from Out of the Blue, peaking at number 6 in the UK Singles Chart and number 35 in the US.

In a BBC Radio interview, Lynne talked about writing “Mr. Blue Sky” after locking himself away in a Swiss chalet and attempting to write ELO’s follow-up to A New World Record:

It was dark and misty for 2 weeks, and I didn’t come up with a thing. Suddenly the sun shone and it was, ‘Wow, look at those beautiful Alps.’ I wrote Mr. Blue Sky and 13 other songs in the next 2 weeks.

ELO leader Jeff Lynne puts “Blue” in a lot of his songs… “Mr. Blue Sky,” “Out of the Blue,” “Midnight Blue,” etc. Lynne is from the Birmingham area in England, where the Birmingham Football Club (or as Americans know it, soccer team) is called the Birmingham Blues. The “blues” in these songs are a tribute to his team.

“Mr. Blue Sky” is played before the start of every football (soccer) match played by Birmingham Football Club (commonly nicknamed “The Blues”)

The song’s arrangement has been called “Beatlesque”, bearing similarities to Beatles songs “Martha My Dear” and “A Day in the Life” while harmonically it shares its unusual first four chords and harmonic rhythm with “Yesterday.”

The arrangement makes prominent use of a cowbell sound (although this is credited on the album to percussionist Bev Bevan, as that of a “fire extinguisher”).

The song also features a heavily vocoded voice singing the phrase “Mr. Blue Sky.” A second vocoded segment at the end of the song was often interpreted as “Mister Blue Sky”; it is actually “Please turn me over” as it is the end of side three, and the listener is being instructed to flip the LP over. (Remember the old days when we used to listen to our music on vinyl and we had to turn the record over to hear the other side?) This fact was confirmed by Jeff Lynne on October 3, 2012 on The One Show.

FUN FACT: The song was played as a wake-up call to astronaut Christopher Ferguson on Day 3 of STS-135, the final mission of Space Shuttle Atlantis.

Black & Blue by Van Halen – “Black and Blue” is a rock song written by the group Van Halen for their 1988 album OU812 (“Oh, You Ate One Too”). It is one of six singles issued for the album, and was the first from the album to hit #1 on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks chart, and peaked at #34 on the Billboard Hot 100.  Songwriters credited were Eddie Van Halen, Alex Van Halen, Sammy Hagar and Michael Anthony.

This song is from the years that Sammy Hagar was with Van Halen. A lot of Van Halen hardcore fans much preferred David Lee Roth and believe that Sammy Hagar “ruined” Van Halen. In fact, the 13 years that Sammy Hagar was with Van Halen, the band is often referred to as “Van Hagar”. OU812 was the second album to feature Sammy Hagar as lead singer.

The lyrics of “Black and Blue” are typical Van Halen (or Van Hagar, whichever). Lots of sex in their songs. And this song is no different. In an interview with Martin Popoff, Sammy Hagar gives a retrospective of the album. Regarding the song, Hagar says:

“I’m a very sexual type person. If I ever write something like that, it’s usually a true experience. It’s a true experience I happened to have had on the 5150 tour, where I was actually bruised up pretty bad, and in the wrong areas too, man. It took me out of commission for a week or so. But it was a good thing and I thought, hat a great phrase “do it to me black and blue.” It’s kind of a typical goofy old-time ‘80s rock ‘n roll lyric. But my most proud thing about that lyric is the way it rhythmically phrases against the music. Because in Van Halen, when Eddie and Alex get together, there weren’t many holes in the music to sing to. I like to sing in the holes. You don’t sing over the lick; you should sing in holes. Well, there’s never any holes in Van Halen. So lyrically, I was a master on that song and I sang completely…you just listen to it some time. It was like ‘boom, dat, oomph, dat, boom, uh’. If you just took it and made drumbeats out of everything I sang and everything else that was on there, it would sound like a Latino song, it was so rhythmically correct. And lyrically, it’s not easy to do that, to find a word that’s going to fit with what you’re trying to say and rhymes and rhythms like that. So I think it’s a masterpiece of phrasing if anything.” 

Angel in Blue by J. Geils Band – “Angel in Blue” is a song written by keyboard player Seth Justman that was first released by the J. Geils Band on their 1981 album Freeze Frame. Released as a single in 1982, the song reached the Top 40. Cissy Houston and Luther Vandross appear on the song as back up vocalists.

J Geils Band 1973

In a Classic Rock Review (dot com) article reviewing the album, the following was written:

“…Although the band bears the name of founding guitarist J. Geils, this album really belongs to keyboardist, songwriter, and producer Seth Justman.

… Through the 1970s, the band achieved moderate commercial success with a few minor hits, but nothing like the worldwide fame that they would enjoy in the early 1980s with Freeze Frame, fueled by the Justman’s catchy and cleaver #1 hit “Centerfold”, which introduced the band to much of the mainstream pop world.

… The album is really a potpourri of songs that can be segmented into one of about three distinct categories. The first of these is the direct pop category, consisting of the smash hit “Centerfold” and the opening title song. Both are bouncy and catchy and lead by an airy and accessible organ riff and upbeat entertainment, while carefully flirting with some risque subject matter. “Freeze Frame” has a great stop-start chorus, and was itself a successful top-ten hit. The band also produced a couple of entertaining music videos for the brand new MTV for these songs, no doubt helping their climb in the charts.

…The next category of songs are synch-dominated, pop-art compositions that deviate vastly from the band’s traditional sound. Here, Justman’s genius shines through as he accomplishes this deviation while he still preserves the album’s overall integrity.

The final category of songs on Freeze Frame maintains the band’s traditional rock/soul sound through the ballad “Angel In Blue” and the rockers “Flamethrower” and “Piss On the Wall.”

“Angel In Blue” is a pleasant tune with a melancholy tone, containing the biggest presence by Geils on the entire album. The song is masterfully constructed with just the right touch of organ and drum beat, and a nice ensemble of backing vocals and horns in the outtro.”

AllMusic critic Stephen Thomas Erlewine describes the song as “terrific neo-doo wop.” Viglione praises it further, stating that it is “arguably the smartest lyric in the J. Geils Band catalogue” with a “strong melody,” concluding that it is “four minutes and fifty-one seconds (on the album) of Peter Wolf reading Seth Justman’s post-“Centerfold” wet dream.” Music critic Robert Christgau describes the song as “slick get-’em-off trash” about “a whore with a heart of brass that I’m just a sucker for.” Mark Coleman of The Rolling Stone Album Guide finds the song to be “haunting.”

“Angel in Blue” peaked at #40 on the Billboard Hot 100, remaining there for two weeks. It also reached #55 in the UK. The song also made the Billboard Singles Radio Action chart in a number of regions, including Buffalo, New York, Annapolis, Maryland, Nashville, Tennessee and Jacksonville, Florida. “Angel in Blue” was also released on a number of J. Geils Band compilation albums, including Centerfold, The Very Best J. Geils Band Album Ever and Best of The J. Geils Band, as well as several multi-artist compilation albums.

In April of 2017, J. Geils, founder and longtime guitarist of the J. Geils Band, was found dead in his Groton, Massachusetts, home on Tuesday (April 11), police confirmed. He was 71 years old.

Angel in Blue Jeans by Train – “Angel in Blue Jeans” is a song recorded by American rock band Train for their seventh studio album Bulletproof Picasso. The album’s first single, released June 9, 2014, finds Pat Monahan singing of falling in love at first sight with an “angel in blue jeans.” Monahan penned the song with the New York-based Norwegian songwriting and music production team consisting of Espen Lind and Amund Bjørklund. The same trio also wrote Train’s hit tunes “Hey Soul Sister” and “Drive By.”

The song’s Western-themed video, influenced by the spaghetti western film genre, features seasoned character actor Danny Trejo (Spy Kids, Machete) going against type by playing the good guy. (Monahan is the villainous sheriff). New Girl’s’ Hannah Simone co-stars as the “angel in blue jeans.” Monahan told Entertainment Tonight he thrived playing the baddie. “I think my face is really good at being a bad guy and it’s great ’cause Danny, who usually is a bad guy, ends up being the hero, which is super cool,” the vocalist said.

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Trejo had to listen to the track around 50 times so he could lip syncs the words properly for the video. “I drove everybody crazy with it, but thank God everybody likes the song. Now everybody’s singing it,” he joked to ET. “This song is gonna be a hit, I’m telling you. Everybody’s heard it. Low riders are all bumping it pretty loud!”

Monahan explained the song’s meaning to Radio.com: “The song is literally about dreaming about trying to find that woman that did a magical thing to you and then you wake up from the dream at the end and you’re laying next to her,” he said. “And then you can relax.”

Blue Jean by David Bowie – “Blue Jean” is a song written and recorded by David Bowie for his sixteenth studio album Tonight, released in 1984. One of only two tracks on the album to be written entirely by Bowie, it was released as a single ahead of the album and charted within the Top 10 in the UK and the United States, peaking at No. 6 and No. 8, respectively. The song is loosely inspired by American rockabilly musician Eddie Cochran.

Bowie described this Eddie Cochran-inspired single in a 1987 interview as “a piece of sexist rock ‘n roll. [laughs] It’s about picking up birds. It’s not very cerebral, that piece.”

Following the commercial success of Bowie’s previous album, Let’s Dance, its singles and the Serious Moonlight Tour, “Blue Jean” was launched with a 21-minute short film, Jazzin’ for Blue Jean, directed by Julien Temple. The song performance segment from this was also used as a more conventional music video. The film won the 1985 Grammy Award for “Best Video, Short form”, later renamed “Best Music Video”, which proved to be the only competitive Grammy Award Bowie won during his lifetime for over three decades, although Bowie posthumously won four Grammies for his album Blackstar (2016).

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“Blue Jean” would remain in Bowie’s live repertoire for the rest of his career, being performed on his Glass Spider Tour (1987), Sound+Vision Tour (1990) and A Reality Tour (2004).

Devil with a Blue Dress On/Good Golly Miss Molly by Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheels – “Devil with a Blue Dress” (also known as “Devil with the Blue Dress On”) is a song written by Shorty Long and William “Mickey” Stevenson, first performed by Long and released as a single in 1964. A later version recorded by Mitch Ryder and The Detroit Wheels in 1966 peaked at #4 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

The song describes a particularly attractive woman who is highly accessorized and has caught the eye of the singer.

The song was originally recorded by Shorty Long in 1964 as “Devil With The Blue Dress.” Long was signed to a Motown label that specialized in Soul recordings, and this was his first single on the label. Long wrote the song with Motown producer Mickey Stevenson. Long’s version was kind of Bluesy and didn’t have the typical Motown sound. Unfortunately for Long, it failed to chart and his only hit was the 1968 novelty song “Here Comes the Judge.” Long died in a boating accident in 1969 at age 29.

Two years later, Mitch Ryder and The Detroit Wheels recorded the song as a medley with an original arrangement of Little Richard’s “Good Golly, Miss Molly”. Their version was notably more up-tempo than Long’s more blues-influenced rendition. Reaching #4 on the Hot 100, their version of the track would end up becoming their most well-known and highest charting hit in the United States.

The Duke Blue Devils (Duke University’s NCAA teams) use “Devil with a Blue Dress On” as a victory song.

Crystal Blue Persuasion by Tommy James & the Shondells – “Crystal Blue Persuasion” is a 1968 song originally recorded by Tommy James and the Shondells and composed by Eddie Gray, Tommy James, and Mike Vale. When released as a single in June 1969, “Crystal Blue Persuasion” became one of the biggest hits for the group, peaking at number two on the Billboard Pop Singles chart for three weeks.

A gentle-tempoed groove, “Crystal Blue Persuasion” was built around a prominent organ part with an understated arrangement, more akin to The Rascals’ sound at the time than to James’s contemporary efforts with psychedelic rock. It included melodic passages for an acoustic guitar, as well as a bass pattern.

In a 1985 interview in Hitch magazine, James said the title of the song came to him while he was reading the Biblical Book of Revelation:

I took the title from the Book of Revelations [sic] in the Bible, reading about the New Jerusalem. The words jumped out at me, and they’re not together; they’re spread out over three or four verses. But it seemed to go together, it’s my favorite of all my songs and one of our most requested.

According to James’s manager, James was actually inspired by his readings of the Book of Ezekiel, which (he remembered as) speaking of a blue Shekhinah light that represented the presence of the Almighty God, and of the Book of Isaiah and Book of Revelation, which tell of a future age of brotherhood of mankind, living in peace and harmony.

Many listeners thought “Crystal Blue Persuasion” was a drug song advocating the use of “crystal meth” (methamphetamine), while on the West Coast. At the time of the song’s release there were several popular types of high quality blue-colored LSD tablets in circulation—some listeners generally assumed James was referring to “acid”. In 1979, noted music writer Dave Marsh described it as “a transparent allegory about James’ involvement with amphetamines.”

The lyrics, “It’s a new vibration,” are about James becoming Christian, but many listeners had their own interpretation. He explained:

“Of course, everybody thinks if they don’t understand what you’re talking about it must be about drugs. But it wasn’t. We were going through a real interesting time back then, and a very wonderful time. Everybody in the band, by the way, became Christian. And we’re very proud of it. And ‘Crystal Blue Persuasion’ was sort of our way of saying that in a kind of pop record way.”

This would have made a great performance at Woodstock, and the song was peaking on the charts at the time of the famous festival. Tommy James & the Shondells were invited to appear, but, as Tommy explains:

“Like dopes we turned it down. I gotta tell you what – we were in Hawaii at the foot of Diamond Head. This was in August of ’69, and we played a date in Hilo, and then we had two weeks off and then we were gonna play in Honolulu. They put us at these gorgeous mansions at the foot of Diamond Head, right on the ocean. And our biggest decision of the day was, Do I go in the ocean or in the swimming pool? We were sitting around drinking margaritas, and it was wonderful. And I get this call from JoAnn, my secretary, and she said, ‘Artie Kornfeld was up,’ Artie Kornfeld was one of the principals at Woodstock, and he was also a friend of mine. He produced the Cowsills and a whole bunch of other acts, and he was very successful producer. We had the same lawyer. And so she said, ‘Artie was up and asked if you could play at this pig farm up in upstate New York.’ I said, ‘What?!?’ ‘Well, they say it’s gonna be a lot of people there, and it’s gonna be like a really important show.’ And I said, ‘Did I hear you right? Did you say would I leave paradise, fly 6,000 miles, and play a pig farm? Is that what you just asked me?’ She said, ‘Well, you could put it like that, but it’s gonna be a big show. It’s important.’ I said, ‘Well, I’ll tell you what, if I’m not there, start without us, will you please?’ And I hung up the phone. And they did. And by Thursday of that week we knew we messed up really bad. (laughing) But in the end I think I got probably more mileage out of that story.”

A primitive non-representational music video was made, that showed various scenes of late 1960s political and cultural unrest and imagery of love and peace.

Blue Bayou by Linda Ronstadt – “Blue Bayou” was originally written and recorded by Roy Orbison on his legendary 1963 album In Dreams. While it only scored as high as #29 in the US (despite scoring #1 in Ireland and #10 in Norway), Linda Ronstadt took it to far greater fame as her only gold-selling single and her signature song.

Linda Ronstadt took the song to number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in late 1977, where it held for four weeks, as well as number 2 Country and number 3 Easy Listening. It also reached number 2, for four weeks, on the Cash Box Top 100 chart.

The single was RIAA certified Gold (for sales of over 1 million US copies) in January 1978. It was the first of Ronstadt’s three Gold singles. Don Henley of the Eagles sang backup on the recording. “Blue Bayou” was later certified Platinum (for over 2 million copies sold in the United States). It was a worldwide smash and was also popular in a Spanish-language version called “Lago Azul”.

Linda Ronstadt has been called “the most successful and certainly the most durable and most gifted woman rock singer of her era” in Andrew Greeley’s book God in Popular Culture.

The song has been recorded by many other artists over the years.

Ronstadt later performed the song on the episode 523 of The Muppet Show, first aired October 26, 1980 on UK, and May 16, 1981 on United States.

Ronstadt’s version appears, in edited form, in the 2017 movie American Made.

FUN FACT: Because of this song, Dickson’s Baseball Dictionary records that a “Linda Ronstadt” is a synonym for a fastball, a pitch that “blew by you”. That phrase was coined by Mets broadcaster Tim McCarver, during a Mets telecast in the 1980s.

Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue by Crystal Gale – “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue” is a song written by Richard Leigh, and recorded by American country music singer Crystal Gayle. It was released in March 1977 as the first single from Gayle’s album We Must Believe in Magic. Despite the title, Gayle herself has blue eyes.

Songwriter Richard Leigh was inspired by his dog, who had brown eyes, while writing this song. It was his second #1 Country hit for Crystal Gayle. Leigh also wrote many other Country classics and is in the Nashville Songwriters’ Hall of Fame.

The song became a worldwide hit single. It was a huge crossover hit for Gayle, making her famous outside the world of Country music. In the United States, it topped the Billboard country music chart and was Gayle’s first (and biggest) crossover pop hit, reaching number 1 on the Cashbox Top 100 for two weeks, and number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 3 weeks, behind Debby Boone’s smash hit, “You Light Up My Life”. The album received Platinum status, the first by a female country singer. The song became Gayle’s signature piece throughout her career. This won 1977 Grammy Awards for Best Country Vocal plus Best Country Song for writer Richard Leigh. In 1978, the song won Gayle a Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance. In 1999, the song was recognized by ASCAP as one of the ten most-performed songs of the 20th century. The song has a jazzy feel to it when compared to many other country songs of that era. Gayle had many more hit singles for the next ten years, such as “Talking in Your Sleep”, “Half the Way” “You and I” (a duet with Eddie Rabbitt) and “I’ll Get Over You”, but none have achieved the same level of success as “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue”.

Gayle made a lot of TV appearances when this became a hit. For many viewers, it was their first look at Gayle, who had hair down to her feet.

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Crystal Gayle nailed this on the first try. “That was a first take,” she recalled to Billboard magazine. “I did not re-sing it. It just fell into place beginning with Pig Robbins’ opening work on the piano. It was magic in the studio that day.” 

Misty Blue by Dorothy Moore – “Misty Blue” is a song written by Bob Montgomery, who was Buddy Holly’s high school singing partner, that has been recorded and made commercially-successful by several music artists. Although Montgomery wrote the song for a different artist in mind, it was brought first to the attention of Wilma Burgess in 1966. It was subsequently recorded by Eddy Arnold the following year, whose version became more successful. A decade later, R&B artist Dorothy Moore released the highest-charting version of the song and it reached the top ten in several different radio formats. Following Moore’s revival of the track, numerous artists re-covered the tune, including country artist Billie Jo Spears. Spears’s version would also go on to become a successful single release. Numerous other artists and musicians of different genres have recorded their own versions of “Misty Blue”. The song is now considered both a country music and R&B standard.

The story of Dorothy Moore’s cover version of this song is sure a case for “all in good time” and “meant to be.” Prior to Moore’s R&B version of “Misty Blue”, Joe Simon cut the song in a similar format. Released in 1972, Simon’s version of the song only became a regional hit.

It was through the Joe Simon version that Malaco Records owner Tommy Couch was familiar with “Misty Blue” which Couch would record in 1973 with Dorothy Moore, a native of Jackson MS who had recorded a number of tracks at the Malaco Studios in Jackson. Moore would recall receiving a morning call at her home from Couch inviting Moore to Couch’s studio to hear a song he deemed perfect for her: (Dorothy Moore quote:) “I didn’t have a car at the time, so I took the bus to Malaco [where] I listened to the song [and] liked it…The rhythm section [was] there [so] we decided to record it. They had the lyrics typed out and [put] in front of me. And we did that record in one take. ‘Misty Blue’ was meant for me” – although Moore admits: “I recorded it just like I did any other. I didn’t say: ‘This is a hit.’ I never saw [great success] coming.”

Evidently reluctant to release the track themselves, Malaco Records shopped Moore’s “Misty Blue” to major labels without success, with the track remaining “in the can” until November 1975 when the cash-strapped Malaco Records used the last of its resources to press Moore’s “Misty Blue” which they released themselves. When Moore was advised of her recording’s belated release by Couch (Dorothy Moore quote:) “I [asked to] come in [to the studio] and add one thing to it. I had a copy of the recording [and had realized] the intro was too long – and [so] I put that ‘mmmm-ooh-a-ooh’ over the first few notes.” Also Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section veteran Jimmy Johnson overdubbed his rhythm guitar work on to the 1973 track. Malaco Records did shop the updated track to Florida-based TK Records whose owner Henry Stone passed on releasing Moore’s “Misty Blue” while agreeing for TK to act as national distributor for Malaco’s own release of the track which Stone began promoting heavily via his own independent network.

After receiving its initial airplay in Chicago and Washington DC, Moore’s single broke in the southern states in April 1976 and three months later it was nominated for a Grammy Award. In 1976 the single reached number 2 on the R&B chart and 3 on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as number 14 on the Adult Contemporary chart. Billboard ranked it as the No. 19 song for 1976.

“Misty Blue” was also a UK hit, reaching number 5 there on the chart dated for the week of 8 August 1976. Moore’s single also achieved hit status in Australia (#5), Canada (#4), New Zealand (#4), and South Africa (#11).

Dorothy Moore was originally a member of the female vocal group The Poppies, who had a #56 pop hit in 1966 in the US with the song “Lullaby of Love.” Moore went solo in the mid-’70s and her version of this song became her biggest hit. On backing vocals was her former Poppies bandmate Fern Kinney, who later in 1980 enjoyed a #1 hit in the UK with “Together We Are Beautiful.”

Midnight Blue by Melissa Manchester – Midnight Blue is the color of the sky under certain shades of moonlight. “Midnight Blue” is a title of a Top Ten hit single by Melissa Manchester that was taken from her 1975 album Melissa: Billboard magazine described the song as “a classically elegant quiet ballad about a pair of longtime lovers putting aside their aggravations until the dawn in order to try making it one more time in memory of all their old times together.”

The song is about a relationship that has been through the ringer; the singer is looking to give it another try, approaching it from a different angle: “Think of me as your friend.”

After meeting Manchester backstage after Bette Midler’s Carnegie Hall concert of 23 June 1972 Bayer Sager suggested she and Manchester write a song to cut as a demo, the result being “Midnight Blue”.

The song had been written by Manchester in 1973 as her first collaboration with Carole Bayer Sager, who would be Manchester’s regular lyricist over the next five years; Manchester would recall: “the songs that I wrote with Carole…all came out of conversations. Therefore the tone of the songs was very conversational. The listener always feels like they are in the moment when that first line is uttered.” [2] According to Manchester the genesis of “Midnight Blue” was a conversation she and Bayer Sager “had about our young husbands, and how as young women we didn’t know how to get through the hard times that every relationship has”; the song was essentially finished but still lacking a title when either Manchester or Bayer Sager said: “Midnight Blue” which Manchester opines “was the perfect fit for the [song’s] overall feeling”.

Other songs Carole Bayer Sager wrote with Manchester include “Just You And I,” “Come In From The Rain” and “Home To Myself” – lots of confessional songs from a female perspective. Bayer Sager explained: “I think just by writing about the things we were going through, we were able to tough the hearts of women who were also struggling, so I’m very proud of those songs.”

In 2012 Manchester would recall promoting “Midnight Blue”:

“I [had been] an album artist [with no cause] to worry about a single. Suddenly, Bell Records was absorbed into Arista Records [whose president] Clive Davis…spoke of things like singles success. [For] ‘Midnight Blue’ we did a really vigorous tour of radio stations and secondary markets” – “I crisscrossed the country to break the song on college radio stations, which were very important at the time. It was right before radio went into automated playlists. Music directors and disc jockeys still had pull. Right after ‘Midnight Blue’, everything changed”  – “We traveled thousands of miles shaking hands and playing: when [the song] finally got from the east coast to the west coast it was so huge…I [will] never forget that first experience of playing the intro to ‘Midnight Blue’ [to have] people started cheering….That was the power of radio.”

Melissa Manchester released two hitless albums on Bell Records before signing a deal with Arista, which issued her third album, Melissa, which contains “Midnight Blue.” The song went to #1 on the Adult Contemporary chart and established Manchester as both a songwriter and artist.

“Midnight Blue” debuted at #90 on the Hot 100 in Billboard magazine dated 10 May 1975: the same issue of Billboard showed the track ranked at #22 on the magazine’s Easy Listening chart where “Midnight Blue” was in its fourth week on the Easy Listening Top 50. In its sixth week on the Billboard Hot 100, “Midnight Blue” entered the Top 40 at #40 on the chart dated 14 June 1975, with the track ranked at #2 on that week’s Billboard Easy Listening chart: “Midnight Blue” would spend the weeks of 21–28 June at #1 on the Billboard Easy Listening chart – eventually being cited as the #1 Easy Listening hit of the year 1975 – while on the Hot 100 the track would ascend to a peak of #6 (8 August 1975).

Manchester’s later accomplishments include co-writing the Kenny Loggins/Stevie Nicks duet “Whenever I Call You “Friend”” and Top 10 singles as an artist with “Don’t Cry Out Loud” and “You Should Hear How She Talks About You.”

FUN FACT: Manchester had personally pitched “Midnight Blue” to Dusty Springfield according to Springfield’s friend Sue Cameron who recalls Manchester visiting Springfield’s Laurel Canyon home and playing Springfield the demo of “Midnight Blue” – Cameron (quote): “She told Melissa no. Melissa leaves the house. I went: ‘Are you crazy?'”

Midnight Blue by Lou Gramm – After doing a decade in Foreigner, Lou Gramm set out on his own in 1987, releasing his first solo single, “Midnight Blue.” The song was hit, going to #5 in America thanks in large part to a video that made the rounds on MTV and also on VH1, which launched two years earlier.

“Midnight Blue” is the first single released by Lou Gramm as a solo artist from his debut solo album Ready or Not in 1987. He had staggering success as the lead singer of Foreigner, which in the previous 10 years had become one of the biggest bands in America. Gramm, who co-wrote most of their songs with guitarist Mick Jones, was disheartened by the direction that band had taken, fearing that slick ballads like “Waiting For A Girl Like You” and “I Want to Know What Love Is” had gotten them away from their roots.

Looking to rediscover a raw, spontaneous sound, Gramm released the album Ready Or Not in early 1987. His “Midnight Blue” spent five weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot Album Rock Tracks, starting on February 14, 1987, and by April, peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100, Gramm’s highest-charting solo hit.

(Later in 1987, Foreigner released another successful album (with Gramm on lead vocals), Inside Information, which contained the hits “Say You Will” and “I Don’t Want to Live Without You.” Gramm released another solo album in 1989 with contained the hit “Just Between You and Me.”)

Stephen Thomas Erlewine of Allmusic calls Gramm’s “Midnight Blue” the “last great single of the album-rock era”. Allmusic reviewer Bret Adams posits that, “despite its hit status, it’s one of the decade’s truly underappreciated singles.”

In this song, Lou Gramm sings about how life is simple, really: it’s either cherry red or midnight blue.

In our interview with Gramm, he explained that cherry red is “everything going as best as it can,” while midnight blue is “dark and mysterious.”

On this track, he makes it clear that he is the darker shade, letting the girl know that he’s going to forge his own path, and while they are split at the moment, he’ll be coming back for her. It’s a very unapologetic love song, as Gramm makes it clear that he doesn’t regret the way he treated her, but is confident that everything will be cherry red once he decides to win her back.

As for the music video: Jim Hershleder (who would later direct videos for Steve Earle, Kathy Mattea and John Fogerty) got the call to make “Midnight Blue.” Gramm was best known in the video age for “I Want to Know What Love Is,” the big Foreigner ballad, but he always considered himself a rocker. For “Midnight Blue,” Hershleder left him unadorned in leather jacket and jeans with his new band. The concurrent storyline is the stuff of teenage dreams: taking the convertible to gather the girl and ride off into the moonlight.

Jim Hershleder directed the video, which benefited from airplay on VH1, which had launched two years earlier. Hershleder told Songfacts:

“The concept stemmed from the power of the song, which seemed to me captured the feeling of being young, having your first car, and picking up your girlfriend who had just snuck out of her house to meet you. My teen years in Minnesota, basically.”

Blue Suede Shoes by Elvis Presley – “Blue Suede Shoes” is a rock-and-roll standard written and first recorded by Carl Perkins in 1955. It is considered one of the first rockabilly (rock-and-roll) records, incorporating elements of blues, country and pop music of the time. Perkins’ original version of the song was on the Cashbox Best Selling Singles list for 16 weeks and spent two weeks in the number two position. Elvis Presley performed his version of the song three different times on national television. It was also recorded by Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochran, among many others.

Blue suede shoes were a luxury item in the South, a stylish footwear for a night out. You had to be careful with them, however, since suede isn’t easy to clean.

Perkins never owned a pair, but Johnny Cash told him a story about someone who did. As Cash told it, he and Perkins were performing at a show in Amory, Mississippi along with Elvis Presley. When Presley was on stage, Cash told Perkins a story from his days serving in the Air Force in Germany. Cash’s sergeant, a black guy named C.V. White, would wear his military best when he was allowed off base, and at one point said to Johnny, “don’t step on my blue suede shoes.” The shoes were really just Air Force-issued black, but white would say, “Tonight they’re blue suede.”

The story Perkins told is that later on, he was playing at a high school sorority dance when he came across a guy who wasn’t paying much attention to his date, but kept telling everyone not to stop on his “suedes,” meaning his blues suede shoes. At 3:00 a.m. that night, Perkins woke up and wrote the lyrics based on what happened that night and the story he heard from Cash. He couldn’t find any paper, so he wrote it on a potato sack.

Perkins recorded this in Memphis for Sam Phillips at Sun Records. As he was driving to make his first national appearance to promote it (on the Perry Como Show), he got into an accident that seriously injured him and killed his brother. “I was 85 miles away from being the first rockabilly on national television,” he recalled.

Perkins never fully recovered, either emotionally or career-wise. With Perkins unable to touring and promote it, Elvis’ cover version became a massive hit. Presley’s copy was done at RCA studios in Nashville.

Elvis’ Rendition: Recording cover versions of songs was a common practice during the 1940s and 1950s, and “Blue Suede Shoes” was one of the first songs RCA Victor wanted its newly contracted artist, Elvis Presley, to record. “Heartbreak Hotel” and “Shoes” rose on the charts at roughly the same time. RCA Victor, with its superior distribution and radio contacts, knew it could probably steal a hit record from Phillips and Perkins. Presley, who knew both Perkins and Phillips from his days at Sun Records, gave in to pressure from RCA, but he requested that the company hold back his version from release as a single. Presley’s version features two guitar solos by Scotty Moore, with Bill Black on bass and D.J. Fontana on drums.

According to Moore, when the song was recorded, “We just went in there and started playing, just winged it. Just followed however Elvis felt.” According to reports confirmed by Sam Phillips, RCA Victor producer Steve Sholes agreed not to release Presley’s version of the song as a single while Perkins’ release was hot.

Presley performed the song on national television three times in 1956. The first was February 11 on Stage Show. He also performed it again on his third appearance on Stage Show on March 17, and again on the Milton Berle Show on April 3. On July 1, Steve Allen introduced Presley on The Steve Allen Show, and Presley, dressed in formal evening wear, said, “I think that I have on something tonight that’s not quite right for evening wear.” Allen asked, “What’s that, Elvis?” “Blue suede shoes” was the answer, as he lifted his left foot to show the audience. Presley mentioned blue suede shoes a second time on this show: in a song during the “Range Roundup” comedy skit with Allen, Andy Griffith, and Imogene Coca, he delivered the line, “I’m a-warnin’ you galoots, don’t step on my blue suede shoes.”

Moore has said that Presley recorded the song to help out Perkins after his accident. “Elvis wasn’t really thinking at that time that it was going to make money for Carl; he was doing it as more of a tribute type thing. Of course Carl was glad he did. It really helped as his record started going down.”

“Blue Suede Shoes” was the first song on the groundbreaking album Elvis Presley, which was released in March. RCA Victor released two other records with “Blue Suede Shoes” the same month: an extended play with four songs (RCA Victor EPA 747) and a double extended play with eight songs (RCA Victor EPB 1254).

RCA Victor released the Presley version as a single on September 8, one of a number of singles RCA issued simultaneously, all culled from the album Elvis Presley. This single reached number 20, whereas Perkins’ version had topped the chart.

In 1960, Presley re-recorded “Blue Suede Shoes” for the soundtrack of the film G.I. Blues. While Presley’s character and his band, the “Three Blazes”, play a ballad at a Frankfurt nightclub (“Doin’ the Best I Can”, by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman), a bored GI plays Presley’s version of “Blue Suede Shoes” on the jukebox, remarking that he wants “to hear an original”. When another soldier tries to unplug the jukebox, the audience erupts in a fight. This studio re-recording was one of the few occasions in Presley’s career in which he agreed to re-record a previously issued song. He did it on this occasion because the rest of the soundtrack was recorded in stereo, and thus a stereo version of “Blue Suede Shoes” was required. The 1960 version uses virtually the same arrangement as the 1956 recording. This version was included on the soundtrack album to G.I. Blues but was never released as a single in the United States.

In 1985, RCA issued a music video of Presley’s original version of “Blue Suede Shoes”. The video featured a contemporary setting and actors (and Carl Perkins in a cameo appearance), with Presley shown in archival footage.

In 1999, Presley’s version was certified as a gold record by the RIAA.

Blue Jay Way by the Beatles – “Blue Jay Way” is a song recorded by those English blokes the Beatles. Written by George Harrison, it was released in 1967 on the group’s Magical Mystery Tour EP and album. The song was named after a street in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles where Harrison stayed in August 1967, shortly before visiting the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco. The lyrics document Harrison’s wait for music publicist Derek Taylor to find his way to Blue Jay Way through the fog-ridden hills, while Harrison struggled to stay awake after the flight from London to Los Angeles.

Blue Jay Way, art by Jacob Jenkins

As with several of Harrison’s compositions from this period, “Blue Jay Way” incorporates aspects of Indian classical music, although the Beatles used only Western instrumentation on the track, including a drone-like Hammond organ part played by Harrison. Created during the group’s psychedelic period, the track makes extensive use of studio techniques such as flanging, Leslie rotary effect, and reversed tape sounds. The song appeared in the Beatles’ 1967 television film Magical Mystery Tour, in a sequence that visually re-creates the sense of haziness and dislocation evident on the recording.

While some reviewers have dismissed the song as monotonous, many others have admired its yearning quality and dark musical mood. The website Consequence of Sound describes “Blue Jay Way” as “a haunted house of a hit, adding an ethereal, creepy mythos to the City of Angels”. Among its continued links with Los Angeles, the song was one of the first Beatles tracks that cult leader Charles Manson adopted as the foundation for his Helter Skelter theory of an American race-related countercultural revolution. Artists who have covered the song include Bud Shank, Colin Newman, Tracy Bonham, Siouxsie and the Banshees and Greg Hawkes.

Background & Inspiration: George Harrison wrote “Blue Jay Way” after arriving in Los Angeles on August 1, 1967 with his wife Pattie Boyd and Beatles aides Neil Aspinall and Alex Mardas. The purpose of the trip was to spend a week with Derek Taylor, the Beatles’ former press officer and latterly the publicist for California-based acts such as the Byrds and the Beach Boys. The visit also allowed Harrison to reunite with his sitar tutor, Ravi Shankar, whose Kinnara School of Music and upcoming concert at the Hollywood Bowl he helped publicize.

“I told [Derek Taylor] on the phone that the house was in Blue Jay Way … There was a fog and it got later and later. To keep myself awake, just as a joke to fill in time, I wrote a song about waiting for him in Blue Jay Way. There was a little Hammond organ in the corner of this rented house … I messed around on this and the song came.”

                     – George Harrison to Hunter Davies, 1968

The title of the song came from a street named Blue Jay Way, one of the “bird streets” high in the Hollywood Hills West area overlooking the Sunset Strip, where Harrison had rented a house for his stay. Jet-lagged after the flight from London, he began writing the composition on a Hammond organ as he and Boyd waited for Taylor and the latter’s wife, Joan, to join them. The home’s location, on a hillside of narrow, winding roads, together with the foggy conditions that night, created the backdrop for the song’s opening lines: “There’s a fog upon L.A. / And my friends have lost their way.” Harrison had almost completed the song by the time the Taylors arrived, around two hours later than planned.

The week with Taylor proved to be important for the direction of the Beatles. At the height of the Summer of Love and the popularity of the band’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album, Harrison, Taylor and their small entourage visited the international “hippie capital” of Haight-Ashbury, in San Francisco, on August 7th. Harrison had expected to encounter an enlightened community engaged in artistic pursuits and working to create a viable alternative lifestyle; instead, he was disappointed that Haight-Ashbury appeared to be populated by drug addicts, dropouts and “hypocrites”. Following his return to England two days later, Harrison completed work on “Blue Jay Way” at his home in Esher, and he shared his disillusionment about Haight-Ashbury with John Lennon. The Beatles then publicly denounced the popular hallucinogen LSD (or “acid”) and other drugs] in favor of Transcendental Meditation under Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, whose seminar in Bangor in Wales the band attended in late August. While noting Harrison’s role in “inspiring the West’s mainstream acquaintance with Hindu religion” through his leadership in this aspect of the Beatles’ career, author Ian MacDonald describes “Blue Jay Way” as a “farewell to psychedelia”, just as “It’s All Too Much”, which the Beatles recorded in May 1967, became Harrison’s “farewell to acid”.

Appearance in Magical Mystery Tour film: The song’s segment in Magical Mystery Tour was shot mainly at RAF West Malling, an air force base near Maidstone in Kent, during the week beginning on 19 September. Described by Womack as “the movie’s hazy, psychedelic sequence”, it features Harrison sitting on a pavement and playing a chalk-drawn keyboard. Dressed in a red suit, he is shown busking on a roadside; next to his keyboard are a white plastic cup and a message written in chalk, reading: “2 wives and kid to support”. The depiction of Harrison, seated cross-legged, matched his public image as the most committed of the Beatles to Transcendental Meditation and Eastern philosophy.

The filming took place in an aircraft hangar, with the scene designed to re-create a typically smog-ridden Los Angeles. Music journalist Kit O’Toole writes that the smoke surrounding Harrison “almost engulf[s] him, mimicking the ‘fog’ described in the lyrics”. Through the use of prismatic photography, the “Blue Jay Way” segment also shows Harrison’s “image refracted as if seen through a fly’s eye”, according to author Alan Clayson, who describes the scene as mirroring “the requisite misty atmosphere” suggested by the recording. In its preview of Magical Mystery Tour in 1967, the NME highlighted the segment as one of the film’s “extremely clever” musical sequences, saying: “For ‘Blue Jay Way’ George is seen sitting cross-legged in a sweating mist which materializes into a variety of shapes and patterns. It’s a pity that most TV viewers will be able to see it only in black and white.”

At other times during the sequence, the four Beatles alternate in the role of a solo cellist. These scenes were filmed on 3 November, on the rockery at Sunny Heights, Starr’s house in Weybridge, Surrey. Tony Barrow, the production manager for Magical Mystery Tour, recalls that, as “a colourful conclusion” to the segment, they set off fireworks that had been bought for the upcoming Guy Fawkes Night celebrations.

The reviews and criticisms of the song varied wildly. The first time I heard it I was like “Whoa, this is awful!” And I pretty much felt like these critics did: A critic of the Beatles’ output immediately post-Sgt. Pepper, Ian MacDonald found “Blue Jay Way” “as unfocused and monotonous as most of the group’s output of this period”, adding that the song “numbingly fails to transcend the weary boredom that inspired it”. Writing for Rolling Stone in 2002, Greg Kot considered it to be “one of [Harrison’s] least-memorable Beatles tracks … a song essentially about boredom – and it sounds like it”. Similarly unimpressed with Magical Mystery Tour, Tim Riley describes “Blue Jay Way” as a song that “goes nowhere tiresomely”, with a vocal that “sounds as tired and droning” as the musical accompaniment. Lol. But there are positive reviews and you can find them on Wikipedia.

AND THAT, MY FRIENDS, IS A WRAP!

We have come to the end of my Kaleidoscope of Color Songs Series. Thank you all for taking this colorful journey with me as we explored all my favorite songs with colors in the titles. I’ve had a wonderful time putting this all together and I sure hope you all have had fun with it too.

There is one little post left in this color series (I can already hear the shouts of “I knew it!” coming from the edges of the blogosphere…) but it won’t be for a while. I’ll let you know when it’s here but for now, I’m taking a break from colors.

Monday’s Music Moves Me (4M) is a blog hop hosted by Marie of X-Mas Dolly, and co-hosted by Cathy of Curious as a Cathy and Stacy of Stacy Uncorked Two other co-hosts recently joined the fun: Alana of Ramlin’ with AM and Naila Moon of Musings & Merriment with Michelle. Be sure to stop by and visit the hosts and the other participants listed below: