Gregg Allman of the Allman Brothers Band dead at 69

photo from alchetron.com site

Another huge loss to the music industry, Gregg Allman has died today at the age of 69. Such a talented musician. I’ve always been a fan of the Allman Brothers and in fact saw them in concert a while back here in Austin at an outdoor venue that I can’t remember (it was that long ago…). The photo above is how I best remember Gregg Allman. And here he is back in 2011, arriving at the 45th Annual CMA Awards:

Gregg Allman

FILE – In this Nov. 9, 2011 file photo, singer Gregg Allman arrives at the 45th Annual CMA Awards in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Evan Agostini, file)

At the end of this post I’ve included a playlist of my favorite Allman Brothers songs. Here’s an interesting tidbit that I came across regarding their 1971 Live album, “At Fillmore East”, considered to be their #1 album:

“Typically, we tend to stay away from live albums on our Best to Worst lists. But ‘At Fillmore East’ isn’t a typical live album. Before its release in 1971, the Allman Brothers were a fledgling southern-rock band with a growing cult interest but little mainstream support. The double live ‘At Fillmore East’ changed all that. The band became huge overnight, and their dynamic performances on this monumental release pretty much set them up for life. It’s a career-making and -defining live album, and arguably the greatest concert album ever made by a rock band.”                  (Source: Ultimate Classic Rock site)

 

 

But first, let’s honor Gregg’s solo work with his most successful single on his own. I’m No Angel, released in 1987 from The Gregg Allman Band’s studio album of the same name. It was an unexpected hit, reaching #1 on Billboard’s Album Rock Tracks chart:

 

I read the sad news in this AP article, as reported by RUSS BYNUM and KRISTIN M. HALL, The Associated Press:

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Music legend Gregg Allman, whose bluesy vocals and soulful touch on the Hammond B-3 organ helped propel the Allman Brothers Band to superstardom and spawn Southern rock, died Saturday, a publicist said. He was 69.

Allman died at his home in Savannah, Georgia, publicist Ken Weinstein said. A statement on the singer’s website says he “passed away peacefully.”

Allman had cancelled some 2016 tour dates, announcing on Aug. 5 that he was “under his doctor’s care at the Mayo Clinic” due to “serious health issues.” Later that year, he canceled more dates, citing a throat injury. And in March 2017, he canceled performances for the rest of the year.

Born in Nashville, Tennessee, the rock star known for his long blond hair was raised in Florida by a single mother after his father was shot to death. Allman idolized his older brother, Duane, eventually joining a series of bands with him. Together they formed the nucleus of The Allman Brothers Band.

The original band featured extended jams, tight guitar harmonies by Duane Allman and Dickey Betts, rhythms from a pair of drummers and the smoky blues inflected voice of Gregg Allman. Songs such as “Whipping Post,” ”Ramblin’ Man” and “Midnight Rider,” helped define what came to be known as Southern rock and opened the doors for such stars as Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Marshall Tucker Band.

In his 2012 memoir, “My Cross to Bear,” Allman described how Duane was a central figure in his life in the years after their father was murdered by a man he met in a bar. The two boys endured a spell in a military school before being swept up in rock music in their teens. Although Gregg was the first to pick up a guitar, it was Duane who excelled at it. So Gregg later switched to the organ.

They failed to crack success until they formed The Allman Brothers Band in 1969. Based in Macon, Georgia, the group featured Betts, drummers Jai Johanny “Jaimoe” Johanson and Butch Trucks and bassist Berry Oakley. They partied to excess while defining a sound that still excites millions.

Their self-titled debut album came out in 1969, but it was their seminal live album “At Fillmore East” in 1971 that catapulted the band to stardom.

Duane Allman had quickly ascended to the pantheon of guitar heroes, not just from his contributions to the Allman band, but from his session work with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett and with Eric Clapton on the classic “Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs” album. But he was killed in a motorcycle accident in October 1971, just months after recording the Fillmore shows. Another motorcycle accident the following year claimed Oakley’s life. .

In a 2012 interview with The Associated Press, Gregg Allman said Duane remained on his mind every day. Once in a while, he could even feel his presence.

“I can tell when he’s there, man,” Allman said. “I’m not going to get all cosmic on you. But listen, he’s there.”

The 1970s brought more highly publicized turmoil: Allman was compelled to testify in a drug case against a former road manager for the band and his marriage to the actress and singer Cher was short-lived even by show business standards.

In 1975, Cher and Allman married three days after she divorced her husband and singing partner, Sonny Bono. Their marriage was tumultuous from the start; Cher requested a divorce just nine days after their Las Vegas wedding, although she dismissed the suit a month later.

Together they released a widely panned duets album under the name “Allman and Woman.” They had one child together, Elijah Blue, and Cher filed for legal separation in 1977.

The Allman Brothers Band likewise split up in the 1980s and then re-formed several times over the years. A changing cast of players has included Derek Trucks, nephew of original drummer Butch Trucks, as well as guitarist Warren Haynes.

Starting in 1990, more than 20 years after its founding, the reunited band began releasing new music and found a new audience. In 1995 the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and won a Grammy Award for best rock instrumental performance for “Jessica” the following year.

In 2000, Betts was ousted from the band via fax for alleged substance abuse and poor performance and he hasn’t played with the band since.

Butch Trucks died in January 2017. Authorities said he shot himself in front of his wife at their Florida home.

In his memoir, Allman said he spent years overindulging in women, drugs and alcohol before getting sober in the mid-1990s. He said that after getting sober, he felt “brand new” at the age of 50.

“I never believed in God until this,” he said in an interview with The Associated Press in 1998. “I asked him to bring me out of this or let me die before all the innings have been played. Now I have started taking on some spiritualism.”

However, after all the years of unhealthy living he ended up with hepatitis C which severely damaged his liver. He underwent a liver transplant in 2010.

The statement on Allman’s website says that as he faced health problems, “Gregg considered being on the road playing music with his brothers and solo band for his beloved fans essential medicine for his soul. Playing music lifted him up and kept him going during the toughest of times.”

After the surgery, he turned music to help him recover and released his first solo album in 14 years “Low Country Blues” in 2011.

“I think it’s because you’re doing something you love,” Allman said in a 2011 interview with The Associated Press. “I think it just creates a diversion from the pain itself. You’ve been swallowed up by something you love, you know, and you’re just totally engulfed.”

The band was honored with a lifetime achievement Grammy in 2012.

 

R.I.P. Gregg Allman! Thanks for the memories…

 

More info on Gregg Allman’s life can be found at the Biography.com website.

And here’s a video tribute by music journalist John Beaudin:

 

 

 

 

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10 thoughts on “Gregg Allman of the Allman Brothers Band dead at 69

    • Blue Sky is one of my favs also. I’m especially fond of Midnight Rider and Ain’t Wastin’ Time No More. And I like his solo single I’m No Angel.
      I always thought it was so cool that he and Cher married. Such an odd pairing…
      Thanks for stopping by Mary. Enjoy your Memorial Day!

      Like

    • Sure. And thanks for your Memorial Day post. I really liked it. Your dad seems like
      he was a great guy…

      Like

    • So true Lee. That’s why when I put together a playlist of my favorite Allman Brothers songs, it ended up being 10. I couldn’t pick just a few…
      Have a good Memorial Day…

      Like

  1. Another sad and shocking loss! 😦 Whipping Post is my favourite Allman Bros. song. That must have been a great concert, Michele. It’s turning into another bad year for celebrity deaths. Still reeling from the news about Chris Cornell!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh I know. Chris Cornell’s death was indeed shocking. Suicide is just so sad. It’s really impactful, even when you didn’t know the person…

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It is very sad that he passed away so young but the hard living caught up to him. At least his great music survives. I have to say……looking at the young picture of Allman just seems to show how much Chaz/Chastity looks like him. I know Sonny is Chaz’s father but I always have this little tug at the back of my neck saying Chaz is not sonny’s child

    Liked by 1 person

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