Battle of the Bands RESULTS – She’s Not There

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Today is the Results post from my most recent battle featuring The Zombies’ “She’s Not There” against Santana’s cover. I’m going to keep this short today because I touched a super hot burner on the stove last night and severely burned three fingers on my left hand — and I’m left-handed, naturally — so it’s making it hard to type.

The really cool thing about this battle is that our own Stephen McCarthy did the same battle two years ago! His battle ended in a tie. Mine did not. The votes that came in for my battle favored the Zombies, yielding them 12 of the 19 votes (Zombies 12, Santana 7).

I definitely liked the Santana cover and their percussion just added so nicely to the song, but my vote went to the Zombies. I like this song in its purest form, done by the original artist.

In closing, here is another of my Zombies favorites, Time of the Season with some great vintage video. Enjoy!

 

As always, thanks for participating in my battle. See you on September 1st for the next round!

Battle of the Bands – She’s Not There

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It’s time for another Battle of the Bands and today I’m featuring the Zombie’s song She’s Not There. Give a listen to the contenders and vote which one you like best in the Comments section. I’ll post the results in 6 days!

“She’s Not There” is the debut single by the British rock band The Zombies, written by organist Rod Argent. It reached No.12 in the UK Singles Chart in September 1964, and reached No.1 on the Cashbox chart (No.2 on the Billboard Hot 100) in the United States at the beginning of December 1964. In Canada, it reached number two.

Rolling Stone magazine ranked “She’s Not There” number 297 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

The song’s background: The narrator has unsatisfactory dealings with an untrustworthy woman. He reproaches unspecified associates for failing to warn him of her unsavory character. The real inspiration behind the song, however, was Argent’s first love Patricia who called off their wedding weeks before and broke his heart.

I’m pitting The Zombies original against a live version by Santana.

Contender #1: The Zombies:

Unfortunately the Live version by The Zombies that I found online did not allow embedding so you’ll have to click on this external link to view it. But it’s worth it! Just right click and open it in another window or tab so you can stay on this page:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKBRc8zNQ30

Or if you’re lazy and don’t want to be bothered, here’s a high quality studio version by the original band:

 

Santana:

The song was a hit again for Santana, which also appeared on their 1977 album Moonflower. Their version of “She’s Not There” peaked at No.11 in the UK, No. 27 in the United States, and No.21 in Canada.

Live version:

 

TIME TO VOTE! Which version do you like better and why? And when you’re done voting, please visit these other BOTB participants and check out their cool battles:

 

 

Battle of the Bands RESULTS: If You Don’t Know Me By Now

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It’s Results Day for my most recent battle featuring the Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes song “If You Don’t Know Me By Now.” Pitting reggae band Zap Pow against Simply Red probably wasn’t the brightest move because we damn near had a shut out. It seems that the Simply Red version simply brings back a rush of memories for people and the group garnered most of the votes. Zap Pow did manage to pull out two votes though.

I was originally going to use Martina McBride’s version against Simply Red and in hindsight that probably would’ve been a better battle because her version is very strong as well. It’s more closely matched to Simply Red’s version. But I wanted to bring something different to the table and Zap Pow definitely provided that. I think they did a fabulous job with the song. I liked it because it wasn’t overly reggae, giving us just a nice hint of the genre.

That being said, my vote is going to Simply Red as well. Their version is just so strong and powerful. I love the vocals.

So, Simply Red wins this battle hands down! Final tally:

Simply Red:   15 votes

Zap Pow:  2 votes

Here’s another Simply Red song that is a favorite of mine. And I suspect many other folks here like this song as well.

 

As always, thanks for playing along! See you on the 15th for another oldie but goodie…

 

Battle of the Bands – If You Don’t Know Me By Now

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It’s time for another Battle of the Bands and today I’m featuring the song If You Don’t Know Me By Now. Give a listen to the two contenders and vote which version you like best in the Comments section. I’ll post the results in 6 days!

“If You Don’t Know Me by Now” is a song written by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff and recorded by the Philly soul musical group Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, which became their first hit after being released as a single in 1972 topping the US R&B chart and peaking at number three on the US Pop chart.

The song was originally written for Labelle (a trio led by Patti LaBelle) but they never recorded it. Much like the issue with “I Miss You” and The Dells passing on it, the song’s composers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff gave the song to Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, which featured Teddy Pendergrass as lead vocalist. In addition to the single release, the song was included on their debut album I Miss You.

Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes version: THIS IS NOT PART OF THE BATTLE! Presented for your listening pleasure only.

This is such a great song and I had four strong contenders that I was considering using, including Joe Stampley’s version and Martina McBride’s very emotional rendition but decided on using the popular version by Simply Red and the reggae version by Jamaican band Zap Pow, which is also very good…plus they bring something different to the party. Here are this battle’s contenders:

Contender #1: Simply Red

It was covered by the English pop/soul band Simply Red, also becoming their best-known hit after reaching number one on the U.S. Hot 100 on July 15, 1989 and at number thirty-eight on the Hot Black Singles chart. It peaked at number two in the UK Singles Chart. It also topped the Canadian Singles Chart.

 

Contender #2: Zap Pow  

Zap Pow was a Jamaican reggae band, whose members have included guitarist Dwight Pinkney, singer Beres Hammond and trumpeter David Madden. They existed from 1969 to 1979. This is a fantastic version of this song with some excellent trumpet work.

 

TIME TO VOTE! Which version do you like better and why? And when you’re done voting, please visit these other BOTB participants and check out their cool battles:

Battle of the Bands RESULTS – Friday on My Mind

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Time for another Battle of the Bands Results. It’s another Friday and I have definitely had Friday on my mind this week. The Easybeats song “Friday on My Mind” was the featured song and the contenders were Gary Moore and Richard Thompson.

I liked both versions and it took me listening a few times to determine who I was going to vote for but in the end I liked the harder edge of guitarist Gary Moore. His version of the song gets my vote.

It was a close battle, albeit a low voter turnout. Where is everybody?? It’s definitely summer!

The final tally:

Gary Moore:   6 votes (including mine)

Richard Thompson:  7 votes

So Richard Thompson takes this battle by a hair!

This is such a great song, especially right at the end of the week. Hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. Thanks for your participation and see you on August 1st for the next battle…